Of course my garbage disposal had to break THIS way

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I do something far more useful. I vote (98%) Republican.
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benick wrote:

I used to have an organic garbage disposal.
It was called "dog."
Mine, like the OP's, died, and I'm now back to using the artificial, electrical, dog.
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I would use this excuse to get a new one, at least 3/4 hp. If it was worn enough for the nut to come off, other things should be equally worn. And I don't know if one could get down in there and torque that nut down sufficiently to keep it from doing a repeat performance.
Garbage disposers have become a disposable item, but are still a few bucks by the time you buy all the stuff you will need to change it. But it sure is nice to have the thing working right again, and work for a long time.
Steve
Visit my blog at www.cabgbypasssurgery.com
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Replace is your only option. However.... Totally agree with opinions here that the disposer is a useless piece of hardware. When our last one gave out some years ago, it was not replaced and SWMBO says it is not missed. She would rather have a more sanitary sink and use the garbage can for what it was intended. So redoing the plumbing to have a simpler lifestyle is your other option. Think of it as your contribution to Earth Day.
Joe
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I have to wonder if putting food down the disposal is any worse for the earth than putting it in the garbage where it will sit in a land- fill. I thought a disposal WAS earth friendly (excessive water use notwithstanding).
Anyhow, I thought about this idea of NOT having a disposal while home for lunch (this was easy since my broken disposal is the one under discussion). I stood at the sink with a bowl of soft Cheerios and milk that would normally have gone down the disposal. Seems like a hassle to pour out the milk and try to keep the cereal in the bowl so I can then put it in the garbage. In this case, I dumped it in the other sink bowl and just smashed the Cheerios down through the basket.
Looks like I'll be watching some videos on disposal replacement. There are a ton of seemingly good ones available.
Thanks for all the replies, folks!
Mike
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Mike wrote:

Yes, I think you're right Mike, replacement is the best bet for you.
If it happened to me, I might just waste some time disassembling the disposer to see if I could chuck the motor armature in my lathe and drill and tap the end of its shaft to accept a piece of threaded rod to replace the busted off stud. But. judging from your OP, that's likely not something you could do.
Jeff (With time to kill and a penchant for gaining enjoyment from fixing the unfixable.)
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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: So what do you think? Is this fixable, or is a replacement disposal : the only viable way to go? If I do end up getting a plan to fix the : unit, it seems like pulling teh disposal from the sink will be the : only way to get down into the guts where the bolt meets the motor.
Years ago, when my car's alternator or starter acted up, I replaced a diode or brushes. Can't even buy small parts anymore. Go to a parts place and they'll gladly sell a remanufactured or new 'assembly'. Time is money. Get a new unit and be done with it in an hour.
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On 22/04/10 4:33 AM, Mike wrote:

Almost certainly the "spinning bolt" is a threaded motor shaft.
Go to Costco and get a new disposal. Your time is worth something too. It takes only an hour or so to remove and replace a disposal.
And of course ignore all the people that tell you to forgo a disposal. Disposals are keeping massive amounts of garbage out of landfills, and they keep the kitchen much more sanitary. They also prevent clogs in drain pipes which can be difficult and expensive to fix.
A composter is another way to reduce the amount of garbage you dump into landfills.
The only time you might not want to have a disposal is if you're using a septic tank rather than being on sewers. It will need to be emptied more frequently if you use a disposal.
I'd say that anyone against having a garbage disposal is a Fox News wathing communist.
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On Fri, 23 Apr 2010 08:58:50 -0700, SMS wrote:

Agreed. It's *just* possible that something could be done to fix it (extending the broken shaft, moving the motor mounting points etc.) but extremely unlikely - and if it broke once, it suggests there's something wrong with the design (the shaft's of poor quality or just under-spec for the job) and so it might just fail in the same way again.

Where I used to live, we had two garbage cans, one for landfill stuff and one for compostable - each was picked up on alternate weeks. Maybe the OP has such a scheme running locally...
cheers
Jules
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Thank God I don't live in your stinky community. I can only imagine how skanky that garbage must smell.
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On Fri, 23 Apr 2010 17:45:29 -0400, Colbyt wrote:

Yeah, I remember when the scheme first came in (previously they used to collect once a week, with no separation according to type) and there was a huge outcry about how it was going to stink, and what a poor service it was.
As it turns out, it really wasn't much of an issue - it was *slightly* noticable at the end of the two weeks at the height of summer, but other than that not a problem. My only worry was what would happen if there was any problem with the system such that a pickup didn't happen though, as then it'd be a month and that would probably be horrible! :-)
All our compostable waste goes on the compost pile here - recycleables go to the drop-off point behind the nearby gas station whenever we need to and happen to be passing anyway (we don't make special trips). All other garbage we haul ourselves in the truck whenever we need to - usually takes about 3 weeks to fill a 55 gal garbage can (and just costs about $50/year in gas)
cheers
Jules
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SMS wrote the following:

Where do you think the sewer treatment plant dumps all their sludge and solids?

A sink drain screen does the same and they don't use electricity.

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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So you admit that you have no point.

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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote the following:

Yes, I admit,. I don't have a point. How is yours?

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Well enough to kick your stupid ass, obviously.
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Here they put it in a huge compost pile, with lawn waste, and sell the compost at HD as "Dillo Dirt". I quit using it as soon as I found out they only do toxicology testing one every 3-5 years. But when I did it made fantastic soil conditioner. I'm more worried about lawn chemicals than the sludge though. No telling what these fools put on their yards.
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My initial reaction to whether it's worth fixing or not is your price-to-pain quotient. You don't mention the size of disposal your using nor the brand. If all you use it for is simple grinding, then a cheap, on-sale model du jour would be the easiest, and ultimately cheapest, route to take.
My BIL, He Who Can Fix Anything Mechanical, would never agree to purchasing a new one because his hobby is fixing the unfixable. He's willing to search out parts, tear things down, and rebuild a new machine simply because he enjoys it. He'll spend a whole weekend rebuilding something without thought to cost in resources and time because that's his hobby.
For my money, and time, the armature was sheered off which means replacing a significant piece inside the housing and motor area, which also means tearing everything apart without breaking it, and THEN putting it back together after you have all the tiny pieces layed out and organized (or labeled), with the same precision as the robots that assembled it prior, properly sealed everything, and hopefully tested it before putting it back under the sink and running water through it.
The call is ultimately yours.
The Ranger
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Mike wrote:

Hi, If it is quite old(~10 years) time for a new unit. I replaced my old ISE unit with new direct replacement stainless steel model. Did not even take one hour. Good luck.
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