Odd latex paint problem...?


Howdy,
Our home is 6 years old.
The interior is painted with latex over skim coat plaster.
In one room, I am in the habit of sitting up in bed while typing on my laptop (like right now) while leaning back against the wall.
Earlier today, I noticed that the paint had deteriorated in the "leaning" area.
There is no visible difference, but if I run my hand along the surface, the paint feels "dry" and smooth until I reach the "leaning" zone.
There, it feels very slightly "tacky" and if I touch it with my fingernail, the paint is extremely soft, and peels off in small areas. The material that peels off is "rubbery" in texture.
Of course, I would love to know what might have caused this problem, but even more important than that is the issue of preparation for a re-coat.
What might be an appropriate way to remove the defective paint? Also, what sort of prep (if any) might be needed to avoid a repeat of the problem.
Thanks for any help,
--
Kenneth

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Are you leaning without a pillow? If so, the problem may have been caused by the oil from your skin, or perspiration.
What brand of paint did you use? For how many days did you let it dry before leaning on the wall?
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On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 21:17:05 -0400, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Howdy,
I do not have information about the brand handy...
The paint dried for more than five years before any leaning.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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Stop back when you have that information.
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My guess is that the walls were not primed first. The moisture from your body has caused the paint to loosen. There is no easy way around this. If the paint on the rest of the wall is still firm I would only stripping away the bad patch and sanding a little bit further beyond that beyond that area, applying a good primer then repaint the entire wall. Then get a headboard :-)

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The paint resin has softened from skin oils. This one of the reasons that people use headboards in the bedroom. In bedrooms used for many years without headboards, you can find similar effects in old wallpaper where the occupant's pillow rested. The area of concern may never refinish properly without aggressive treatment with a strong solvent. Methylene chloride based paint removers might get the job done as a first try of commercially available materials. Follow directions, as always. To avoid the problem in the future, put up a head board or other wall protection furniture. HTH
Joe
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wrote:

The paint resin has softened from skin oils. This one of the reasons that people use headboards in the bedroom. In bedrooms used for many years without headboards, you can find similar effects in old wallpaper where the occupant's pillow rested. The area of concern may never refinish properly without aggressive treatment with a strong solvent. Methylene chloride based paint removers might get the job done as a first try of commercially available materials. Follow directions, as always. To avoid the problem in the future, put up a head board or other wall protection furniture. HTH
Joe ==========
Or even a large pillow, which worked for me for 20 years. Tricky technology, though.
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Either get a headboard or completely strip the paint and repaint with oil based paints. Be prepared for some serious sticker shock on the paint thinner though.
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On Wed, 30 Jul 2008 14:38:46 -0400, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Hi again Joe,
One more question:
It had been suggested to me that I swab the area with alcohol, and though that might not have solved the problem, it did make a difference in a positive way.
I wondered about sanding off the defective area and then painting it with a wash coat of shellac.
Would that seal things well enough to avoid trouble when recoating the area with latex?
Thanks again,
--
Kenneth

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wrote:

Repeated swabbing with denatured (very dry) alcohol should work pretty well. Chlorinated solvents are better for dissolving fatty acid compounds as present in skin oils. However, choose the route that seems most reasonable for you. Shellac is, indeed, a good stain blocker. It is the secret ingredient in Kilz and Zinnser's well regarded primers. Most serious woodworkers keep old fashioned finish materials like shellac, linseed oil, and tung oil handy in the shop because of their usefulness in fine finishes. Those of us with impossibly long lists of unfinished projects tend to drag out the HVLP rig and aqueous polyurethanes trying to catch up...but I digress. Cheers,
Joe
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On Wed, 30 Jul 2008 11:22:56 -0700 (PDT), Joe

Hey Joe,
I appreciate your comments. The prep info was just what I was after.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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