Oak Tree removal

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I have an oak tree in my front yard which is about 40 feet tall that I want to have cut down and hauled away. I live in North Central Dallas. Next week I will be calling a company that does this type of work to get an estimate. In the mean time I'm just curious if anyone has had a similar experience with a tree removal in the recent past. Mostly I would like to find out what kind of price I should be expected to pay.
Thanks, Don
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If the tree is straight and thick, you might get someone to take it away for free. Consider how much wood is worth these days!
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Noozer writes:

I think you're confusing unharvested timber with finished lumber. The value is almost all in the harvesting and finishing, not the raw material.
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DONT GO FOR PRICE!!! GO FOR QUALITY AND SAFETY!!
I once took the low bidder, seriously BAD decision!
the idiot crew damaged the homes roof a little, knocked over a pole light breaking the underground wiring, and their grand finale was taking down a 15 THOUSAND VOLT POOWER LINE, fortunately no one got killed it was very close thing...........
stupid neighbor tried driving over what might have been a live power line, police were on site, neighbors unhappy beteen power failure and cable outage, which effected a 5 mile area:( late afternoon it messed up dinner for many, a couple neighbors came and yelled at me, seems one worked shifts and was late for work
clean up and police reports took 2 additional days let alone roof repair and had to dig up and replace pole light and wiring.
by that time I deducted some when paying the tree crew, I saw their carelesness, climber was in big hurry.
I suggested they all get a new line of work before someone died.
Heard later their insurance paid out 15 grand in damages they probably went out of business.
Learn from my bad experience. If the tree overhangs wires or a building it will cost a fortune. In some areas the power company will take trees below the level of the lines for free with a written guarantee of NOT planting a new one...
One last thought many people LOVE a mature tree it can add thousands in resale value, something to consider...
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On Sun, 30 Jul 2006 10:34:19 -0500, "Freckles"

They charged my neighbor $6000 to remove a big ficus tree and it had already fallen on their house (Hurricane Charlie)
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On Sun, 30 Jul 2006 10:34:19 -0500, "Freckles"

It gripes me to see an Oak that is possibly 100 - 200 years old cut down. If you do cut it down add the cost of grinding the stump down, the roots are massive.
Oren
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wrote:

Yeah, it would me too.... but a 40-foot-tall oak isn't anywhere near *one* century old, let alone *two*.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Sun, 30 Jul 2006 21:22:45 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

You are so wrong on this.
The tree could easily be 300 years old, or 25.
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wrote:

300 years old, and only 40' tall??? Yeah, right. We're talking about oak here, not bristlecone pine.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Mon, 31 Jul 2006 10:47:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Most oak varities will never see 40 feet tall.
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wrote:

You're joking, right?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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(Doug Miller)

The oak trees we had on our farm back in Kentucky were at least three feet in diameter and well over 100 feet tall. There were hundreds of them all over the area in Kentucky where I lived.
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On Mon, 31 Jul 2006 12:56:12 -0500, "Freckles"

For every 100 foot oak tree, there are a million scrub oak and blackjack oak with an average height of 15 to 25 feet.
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(Doug Miller)

Millions?
Those may be called trees, but I think they are actually bushes or shrubs.
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On Mon, 31 Jul 2006 17:43:40 -0500, "Freckles"

I think we need to understand there are lots of kinds of oaks. If you ere in the south or west an oak is a knarled bushy thing that may be 30' high. (scrub oak, live oak etc) In the north central states and north east they are telephone poles with leaves on them (pin oak, white oak, red oak).
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(Doug Miller)

I live in the south west and the oaks in my yard are about 40 feet high. When I moved into this house 4 years ago those trees were less than 30 feet tall. They are red oaks.
According to my encyclopedia a scrub oak is a shrub, not a tree.
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wrote:

And it gripes me to see my house and roof and my next door neighbor's house and roof damaged by the tree limbs and roots. And the tree is less than 20 years old.
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On Sun, 30 Jul 2006 16:35:04 -0500, "Freckles"

By all means take it down. Your original post did not mention house damage, etc. Since it affects the home next door, perhaps the expense of removal can be shared or off-set a little with the neighbor.
Oren
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Get several estimates and make sure they are all bidding on the same work. Some will just do cut down, others will cut and remove and clean up.
--
Have a Great Week !

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Be sure they are insured, call their broker, fake or expired certificates are common.
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