O.T. Solar power.

Page 2 of 2  
On Apr 24, 11:48am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That suit was started by Ramsey Clark in the last days of the Johnson administration. Nuff said..... Years passed in litigation and technology changed the market on it's own.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 Apr 2011 14:08:12 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

From what I see the only real thing that changed was the government's attitude on monopolies. Evidently they are just ignoring them. At the rate we are going we are going to end up with 2 or 3 unregulated phone companies instead of the 2 or 3 regulated ones we had before 1978. The situation with Microsoft and Apple/Linux et al is certainly analogous to IBM and tit's competitors in the 60s ... or even the 50s when the first anti-trust suit was filed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 Apr 2011 07:07:59 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

You can also not run *any* OS. Your choice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The real problem with solar or wind being a significant part of the grid is that you still need virtually 100% of the generating capacity available to kick in at a moment's notice unless you are willing to tolerate brownouts and blackouts when a cloud comes over or the wind stops.
In fact if you watch wind turbines for any length of time you will see them feathering the turbines to handle load variations while the fossil plants continue to run.
You are also going to have your whole grid running at the mercy of the maintenance habits of thousands of homeowners. I wonder what the reliability rate will be in the out years. You can hate the evil utility all you like but they do have better maintenance regimens than the average homeowner and they are better equipped to recover from a natural disaster.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The unsolved problem with automotive alternators is a horrible efficiency ratio. With a petrol engine providing massive amounts of power for a relatively small alternator draw, they do not care much about how efficient it is. The automotive A/C units have the same issue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/24/2011 11:38 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What is a typical automotive alternator? 80 Amps. Getting 960 watts from a rotating device the size of a small grapefruit is pretty efficient.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It is the amount of lost power they give up. There are several articles on the green power web sites explaining this. I was surprised myself. It looked like an easy solution and if maximum efficiency is not your goal they are cheap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good God, you're clueless. Not only is the load varying but so is the generation; much of it synchronized, in unpredictable areas, rather than at random (which is actually *more* predictable).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a damned good thing you're not an EE.

Try reading, imbecile.

You really are a clueless asshat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which just shows how far back into the 19th century your brain is.

Utter nonsense.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
zek wrote:

Good plan. Regarding the gun: get two. A long gun and a pistol.
Also hoard a vast quantity of ammunition, at least a thousand rounds for each.
In a complete breakdown of society, ammunition is the new gold.
With sufficient bullets, all other things are obtainable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik wrote:

yes. they're warranteed to produce 95% of rating at the 25 year mark. mine are made by one of the largest producers in the world, so i'd expect them to be around for that long.

it's the same warrantee as any other electrical component; limited to equipment replacement, not warranteed for any other expenses or losses. it's covered by normal home owners insurance (hail, loss, theft, fire, etc).
my panels went through a hail storm last fall, which is very rare in my area. golfball sized. no damage at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It is plenty if the sun can keep the batteries up during the day and I have modest usage at night. My only interest would be for enough power to keep a fridge and a water pump going after a hurricane. Maybe a little extra power for a TV. That is 9 KWH or so. That is why I was looking at the 2300W system. In an off grid configuration it would bring my batteries back from dead in a day with some left over.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I am aware of that. These are 250 A/H batteries, 6 at 6 volts each, so it is 250 * 36 = 9000 w/h. I also understand you can't really use all of that if you want to keep your batteries in decent shape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

South Florida. They were telling me I should count on about 5 hours worth of the rated capacity, averaged over a full day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.