NYC subway repair

Page 3 of 3  
Peter wrote:

Wood stove and cold weather?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In the winter, when we are most likely to be without power, a snowbank or the garage works fine for refrigeration - heck, the house can be cold enough. If it looks like the power will be out long enough we just drain the water, lock the doors, and head up to the (friend's) farm. Wood furnace, a few hundred gallons of fuel oil to run the tractor on the genset if required, 6 cords of wood out beside the barn, and lots of food in the cellar and freezers.
When a storn is forcast, BOTH vehicles have full tanks - so does the snowblower and the generator - and both jerry cans are also full. If we have to empty one vehicle to keep the generator going the other one still has enough to get us a few hundred miles from home if we have to - and the farm is only 20 miles - if the power stays out that long.
Generator was a bit hard starting, even after cleaning the carb and putting in fresh gas this week - had a sticky intake valve so I just fixed THAT this afternoon. Second pull starts the 1950s era Onan now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.

Woodstove for heat. If it is winter, no worries about refrigeration, just put the stuff out in the snow. Last time in summer was hurricane Gloria and we held things for the two days we were out. Beyond that, I'm SOL unless I borrow a neighbor's generator to run the freezer for a couple of hours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

City dwellers take most everything for granted, rural dwellers not so much. While those in the city run around helpless wondering when the transportation they rely on will be running, where they will get their TP, etc. Rural dwellers are already out cleaning up the mess, cutting up the fallen trees, etc. and otherwise taking responsibility for themselves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/3/12 12:57 PM, Pete C. wrote:

Kinda' the same split you see with self-reliant conservatives vs. government-dependent liberals ;-)
--
Don't forget to change your clocks on Saturday-- and your President on
Tuesday.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/3/2012 12:57 PM, Pete C. wrote:

So you also do your own medical procedures and dental work on yourself?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/4/12 8:24 AM, George wrote:

Reductio ad absurdum.
Look it up if you don't know what it means;-)
--
Don't forget to change your clocks on Saturday-- and your President on
Tuesday.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/4/2012 11:07 AM, Douglas C. Neidermeyer wrote:

Common debate/discussion tactic of the P.L.L.C.F. which stands for: Progressive Liberal Leftist Commiecrat Freak/s, the acronym saves a lot of typing. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, but do they sell ammunition in the hospital gift shop?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Smitty Two wrote:

Well, no. Patients have to bring their own.
When our concealed handgun license law was passed (thank you Governor Bush), it originally contained a prohibition against licensed carry in hospitals (and churches and a few other benign places).
Due to popular demand, however, a subsequent session of the legislature repealed the no-carry-in-hospital provision (and churches).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stormin Mormon wrote:

I heard they even have pump-trains.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/3/2012 3:07 PM, G. Morgan wrote:

They have 3 diesel powered pump trains. They basically pull up to a flooded area and run discharge hoses up vents to the street and start pumping.
What cracks me up are all of the people who think all you need to deal with storm damage of this magnitude is a sheet of bounty..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

That's good, as long as the storm drains on street level can handle it.

No doubt. Water is always the biggest problem in a storm like this, many think it's the wind.
I talked to a friend outside of Yonkers, NY. He says the train just started running again, clear into Grand Central.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/3/2012 4:02 PM, G. Morgan wrote:

The 7 train is also running the full run from 42nd St to Main St Flushing. They had to pump out the Steinway tube and get the signals going to make that happen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

In 1972, I worked for a company that got a contract to do the cleanup in an industrial plant after Agnes stalled out and flooded the Chemung Valley of NY, including Corning and Painted Psot. We needed two or three rools of Bounty... 6 feet of muddy water on the production floor doesn't do much for the machinery.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.