NYC dumpster diving for food

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http://www.nbcnewyork.com/video /#!/on-air/as-seen-on/Sandy-Starved-New-Yorkers-Dumpster-Dive/176839571
After only three days, people without food. Guess they weren't prepared?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 11/2/2012 7:36 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I saw a picture of a crew cleaning out a damaged grocery store and caned goods and food in sealed glass jars was being tossed into a garbage truck. It surprised me that unspoiled, uncontaminated food was being thrown away. O_o
TDD
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I'd guess that a LOT of the food being put in dumpsters is just fine. But, insurance and so on, prevents the store owners from donating or selling.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I saw a picture of a crew cleaning out a damaged grocery store and caned goods and food in sealed glass jars was being tossed into a garbage truck. It surprised me that unspoiled, uncontaminated food was being thrown away. O_o
TDD
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In today's lawsuit-happy society, if they sold it someone would claim to have been poisoned and sue the store for all they money the have. That's why it was dumped.
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On 11/2/2012 1:29 PM, David Kaye wrote:

I'm glad you're such an expert. If I could guess, any such lawsuit would be tossed, if not be a sane judge but by a jury made up of people who lived through the disaster and scrambled for food. The jury would likely tell the complaining party to shut the hell up an go away. ^_^
TDD
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On 03/11/12 15:28, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Sadly unlikely. most juries are biased towards the welfare recipeint and whilst some would have that attitude, many are handout focused. YMMV.
In this country, if the item is sold, it has to meet health requirements. thes requirements do not in any way allow taking a bath in flood waters.
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On 03/11/12 01:38, The Daring Dufas wrote:

If it has been immersed in contaminated water, it could be very dangeous to opn and use it.
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On Sat, 03 Nov 2012 03:04:33 +1100, terryc

Yes, I heard that on the radio the day aftrer the storm was here (Baltimore) They said even sealed cans had to be thrown out. I don't believe it -- I'm sure it can be washed in hot water and soap or with alcohol or lysol, and rinsed off, but I'm sure it's still grounds for a successful lawsuit if they sold the stuff.
They also said after 4 hours, I think they mean without electricity for the fridge, foods they named had to be thrown out. That's ridiculous. It doesn't even start to get cold in four hours. I had little icecream dishes (4 for a dollar) in my freezer, and they hadn't even thawed in the 7 hours I had no electricity.
They also said if the foods they named reached 40 degrees F, they had to be thrown out. More nonsesnse. Hey, I keep my fridge at 45 all year round and it takes a week or weeks for anything to spoil. Somethings like tomatoes get a mold spot before that, which can be cut out, or they get unappealing after a week but they can still be eaten.
Everything in the fridge could last 2 or 3 days without power. I live alone but a familiy of four might open the doors more and cause things to warm up faster, especially if one opens the door and just stares at the food.
I routinely forget and leave the milk out all night and it's always good the next day all day. If it starts to go sour, my mother made sour milk pancakes with it.
I think they mentioned butter. For one reason or another butter can be left out for days without spoiling. I think making butter was a means of preserviing milk.
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wrote:

Not radio. It was the TV, some morning show, and except maybe for cans and jars, I don't think they said anything about being under water, only about getting warm.
I've never lost food in a power failure, even one that went for 3 days. I eat the most perishable stuff first and then gradually eat the less perishable. 24 hours without power means nothing.

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In college my roommate insisted that ketchup didn't need to be refridgerated and I insisted that Hershey's syrup didn't need to be, so we left them both out all the time and we both learned the other was right. (The syrup gets a layer of mold after a week or two, but only if you leave it uncovered. If you pour it and cover it immediatyely that doesn't happen, and if it does, you can just remove the lid and pull off the layer of mold. The syrup underneath is fine. And he was right about ketchup, which stays out all the time at restaurants.
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micky wrote:

If you think on it, almost anything with a high acid content should be immune to biological contamination at room temperature: Mustard, pickles (relish), catsup, etc.
This is not the same for chemical reactions. For example, catsup will turn into a Phillips screwdriver (or something) if left unsued for months.
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That's Milk of Magnesia but still a good joke.
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On 03/11/12 11:59, micky wrote:

Eaxactly on cans. You can give them a good clean up and look/test for punctures.
Stuff with modern twist lids are a bit more dubiou as unlike the old screw lids, it really is a shrt parth the the goods inside, I doubt that I'd want to trust any of those, even those that stillhad a good vacum. removing the lid might just dislodge some contaminant to fall inside and that could be enough for a very painfull episode.

It depends on the item. You have to ensure that NONE of the surface area has melted and then refrozen. It isn't about your stuff in your freezer, but the stuff in open top display cabinents as they rely on the continual blanket of cold air to keep them safe. .

It isn't about spoil, but survivability of microbes.

Unfortunately, the number of people with reall cooking skills these days is inversely proportional to the amount of prepackaged foor a supermarket sells.

Old food methods from short delivery mechanisms can not be compared to modern industrial food methods with long delivery chains.
We have a vegetable garden mainly because the food tastes so much better.
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You have to remember that in that area, for every NYC bus crash, more people file injury claims than the bus can carry.
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Old days? I've never refrigerated my butter dish.
I'm over 60 and have never experienced rancid butter. A week at room temp will not hurt commercial, salted butter. [Maybe it would be different with home made or unsalted.]
Jim
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On Fri, 02 Nov 2012 09:38:26 -0500, The Daring Dufas

The chemical, E. coli and coliform levels were too high in the flood waters to risk contamination under the jar lid- They were even advising to toss cans if they had been underwater.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I don't think I'd want anything to do with a can that had made contact with the East River either.
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On 11/2/2012 11:05 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I also saw pictures and video of neighborhoods full of people raiding the dumpsters like a troupe of monkeys. I suppose they didn't care about the possibility of contamination. Oh yea, the majority of them were Caucasian for those of you who may have a Politically Correct twitch. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

Which..is utter bullshit. Simply fill a garbage can with bleach water, dump in your jars and cans, let em soak for a couple minutes, remove and let dry..and they will be just fine.
If the cap on a jar is still sealed..still has the depression in it..the only bugs one needs to worry about are on the outside. So wash em down and they will be fine.
Gunner
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On 11/3/2012 5:08 AM, Gunner wrote:

Gunner, some folks are just plain silly and if those people so afraid of a little contamination were to wind up in a life and death survival situation, I'm sure many of them would eat dirty worms to survive. ^_^
TDD
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