Now to frame new ceiling

Due to AC duct work and clearances, I am having to create a lower ceiling.
The joists are 100" from the floor. The previous owner had framed a ceiling at 6'6" from the floor due to the need to route a large AC coil across that room. I removed the low ceiling board and framing, and had someone redo the AC coil a different shape and tuck it partly into the attic and was able to reduce the protrusion all the way down to 92" from the floor, still 8" below the original roof joists but that's the best I can do.
Now I need to frame in a new ceiling, I will mount to this a few lights and a ceiling fan.
What is the best way to frame this ceiling? The room is 7'6" in width and I have walls on both sides with studs 16" apart. I am thinking of using 2x4s spaced 16" apart and attach them directly to the studs. I am not sure how to make the attachment, was thinking of using some Simpson hangers but not sure which one would work, however if I did, then when I mount the ceiling sheet rock the edges will be wrapped in metal and I will have trouble shooting drywall screws up.
Any ideas on what is the best way to frame this ceiling?
Thanks,
MC
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MC-
How about running the 2x4 passed the face of the studs into the wall cavity thus creating overlap for nailing?
Get out your framing gun & shoot a couple 16d shorts and you're done.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

MC-
How about running the 2x4 passed the face of the studs into the wall cavity thus creating overlap for nailing?
Get out your framing gun & shoot a couple 16d shorts and you're done.
cheers Bob
Ditto what Bob suggested but I'd sister a 2X4 underneath the ceiling 2X4 to beef up the wall stud..
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benick wrote:

Depending on area (and what floor this is) that may not meet fire code. That would create a path from wall cavity to above the ceiling. May have to add blocking in each stud bay, or something.
Hate to say it, but this sounds like a perfect application for a drop ceiling, as much as I hate them. Especially true if OP ever wants access to the HVAC stuff buried up there. If his heart is set on drywall, just nail a horizontal 2x6 onto the face of the studs, and toenail the joists for the faux ceiling into that. If room is that narrow, not a lot of strength needed, since no load from above- it is just holding the drywall/lights/fan. Probably still need blocking in the stud bays, or rock on the wall in the dead space, though.
One of those situations that is hard to advise about without seeing it.
-- aem sends....
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wrote:

That is a good point. I will keep that in mind and if there are any slivers of space to cover that up.
Thanks,
MC
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wrote:

That sounds like it may work. I will check into it. Thanks!
MC
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wrote:

I am wondering, should I just put 2x4s up with the top edge of it butt up to the bottom of the top plate, which means I assume the top plate to be level and even on both sides (I did some measurements and it seems to be), and then hope that the finished frame will be all even and level with each other, or should I score a line a little lower than the "4" of the 2x4 all the way across, and attach the 2x4s with their bottom against it.
MC
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wrote:

There is a small problem. The two walls of this bathroom are not built the same way. In other words, the spacing of the studs do not correspond to each other. So if I run a 2x4 on the face of the stud on one wall, the other wall the 2x4 may hit the middle of the stud, or be in between two studs. I don't think this would work.
I think I need to add blocking to the bottom of the top plate, which in essense will make the top plate not 2x4 but 4x4, and then use 2x4 to butt joint the top plate and the 2x4 below it.
Thoughts?
MC
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Put a 2x4 ledger on the face of one set of studs...you'll loose 1.5" out of the room but its quick & easy.
A 1x might even work since you're only concerned with the weigh of a ceiling.
Continuous members are easier to deal with that cutting & fitting a bunch of blocking and trying to get it all trued up will be a PITA.
Or if you dont want to lose even 1.5 or 3/4" ....use the 1x4 as temp ledger, install the 2x4 ceiling joists, cut blocks & hold them in position beneath the 2x4 joists with ~8" 2x4 stubs. Nail gun them in place and when you're all done remove the temporary ledger.
cheers Bob
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MiamiCuse wrote:

You could have framed it already in the time it took to read all the emails, is my first thought :^/
If you want to make it REAL simple, put a band of 2x10 up against the existing joists and top plate/studs, all the way around the inside of the room. That eliminates cutting and fitting all the blocking. Then, depending on how the studs line up, and access from the far side of the wall, either end-nail or toe-nail or use hangers, to hang your new 2x6 joists, even with the bottom edge of the banding. If the fan is heavy, put blocking across the top of 3 joists in the middle, to stiffen up that area. Not conventional framing style, but it will be plenty strong enough for what you need, and go up quick. If 2x10 are too expensive, put up a band of 1x6 at the top, and 2x4 below it. Should net you nine inches either way.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

I already framed it last weekend...and then I took it all down because of poor planning I forgot to consider a few details. This is a second attempt at it trying to do the framing at the same time consider all other aspects, clearance for hi-hats, clearance for exhaust fan, attic access hatch, AC handler right up, drain pan drain lines, exhaust fan duct, electrical conduits, AC returns and supplies all coming together up there in that space.
Thanks,
MC
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On Sat, 07 Feb 2009 21:30:19 -0500, MiamiCuse wrote:

For a ceiling of this size have you considered using MF? I have no idea what they're called in the US but the basic subframe is metal (much the same as metal stud drywall) suspended using 25mmx25mm (1"x1") galv angle The boards attached to this frame come in 600mmx900mm (3"x6") for easy one-man installation.
I would do it this way, as it would be much easier and quicker in your circumstances than making up and installing a timber frame.
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If I were having a problem figuring out how to do something the right way I would consult a building inspector. That is what they are for. I'm sure you don't want to do something that will be a safety concern or lower your resale value. They will make sure that won't happen.
The cost of a permit, if one is necessary, is cheap insurance.
G.S.
Get
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