Novice Attempts Water Heater Replacement

I'm attempting to replace my water heater for the first time, and am stuck. I've unscrewed the water connections, but the pressure release valve seems to have been soldered. (See photo at http://www.inhouzemusic.com/z/prvalve.html ) How do I go about removing the pressure release valve? Heat up the connection with a torch and unscrew before it cools?
Also, I can't seem to get the gas line disconnected. None of the connection points seem to give at all. Could they have been soldered as well? Is there a trick to getting the gas line disassembled? Where is the proper point to disconnect:
A) The point immediately after the on/off valve? B) The next attachment point at the other end of the valve? C) The point where it enters the control panel?
(See photo at http://www.inhouzemusic.com/z/gasline.html )
Thanks.
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First of all, I suggest going to the site http://www.thehomeshow.com/hih/howtos/water_heater/wheater.html
You may need a longer gas line. I suggest B and C, though. Also, leave the pressure relief valve alone. Use the one on the new heater. cut the pipe from the old one. Or whatever, since you didn't give details. Go to Home Depot, find a product called Copper-Bond if the pipes are copper. It'll make your job a lot easier. Cut the end off a Q-tip, use the stick to stir and apply. Mix in a bottle cap. The thing at the end of the gas line is not called the control panel. It's the regulator. Two wrenches, one on B, other on C. Keep C from turning, turn B counter-clockwise. After removing B, remove C. On putting them back on, use Teflon tape on C, secure it, then put B back in and secure. Soap in some water, apply with brush to check for leaks. Reconsider. Have your neighborhood handyman do it, then call your local Health Dept, find out who inspects homeowner- occupied/homeowner-replaced water heaters. Because if it's not done right, it can kill you, and then where would you be with your saved money?

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If ya cant even take it apart you sure are not qualified to put one in , get a pro. Anybody that helps you is wrong.
This is so you dont kill someone .
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Given your lack of experience and the questions you are asking, I strongly suggest you either get a plumber in or someone you know that knows what they are doing. Working on gas lines is not the place for someone with no basic plumbing skills to start.
Having said that, the gas line can be disconnected by unscrewing the fitting at point B. The pipe connected to the pressure relief valve can be unsoldered using a propane torch, after you have drained the tank. Or, you can just cut the pipe a few inchs from the valve, then reuse everything on the new unit and rejoin the pipe by soldering in a coupling. Don't use copper bond glue as was suggested. Not only doesn't this meet code, it's a very half assed way of doing any plumbing.
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I know a bit about plumbing , water heaters and hvac, but when my last 2 water heaters went in on the first he did work on the exaust I missed, I learned, On the second the "Pro" friend had major trouble on a commercial unit. Little things and thats all a water heater is can cause major problems down road. Its not a thing to learn on, especialy online.
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Half-assed plumbing? Tough. If it gets the job done, and doesn't leak, it's good enough for anyone here. Copper-Bond is currently listed under UL, and being evaluated by NSF. http://www.copperbond.com/cb1a.htm#nsf%20approved
Put it this way. I am very talented with torch and solder, and have stopped using both nowadays. Take a complete novice, without the skills necessary, and it would certainly be better to use Copper-Bond, with the simple instructions at their site, than to try to walk the novice through some of the other options. That's my opinion, and it's why I told what I did. Not likely to change my mind any time soon either.
Hey, Novice. Read those instructions , and the comments at the website, if you decide to use the product. Code-approved or not. Shucks, PVC pipe was not code-approved for many years. With good reason, and it had little to do with function.
And I think the website on changing a water heater was a good one. If someone needs instructions on commodes, I'd point them toward the Toiletology 101 site, etc.

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On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 20:54:24 -0400, "Michael Baugh"

How much does that stuff cost? What's the shelf life?
Does Home Depot sell it?
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
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It's about 5 dollars at Home Depot. No indication of shelf life. It's a two-part epoxy, for copper. But the stick they have in the kit is awful, and I've told them so. It's flat, and should be round, as I see it, After all, you're going into a round fitting. Biggest problems are if the copper isn't scoured properly (steel wool, sandpaper, wire brush preferred as with regular soldering) and trying to move the joint after the setup has started after about 3 seconds.
wrote:

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On Wed, 14 Jul 2004 05:44:45 -0400, "Michael Baugh"

Plus...you'd hafta mark all the pieces, wouldn't ya?...and then line up the marks when you do the twist?
I think I'll stick with solder! lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
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Michael, thank you so much for your kind and knowledgable advice. The installation went without a hitch. I took my time, was extremely careful with every step, and am proud to say I was able to do it myself. The installation passed inspection, no deaths occurred, the house is still standing, and I have a wealth of aquired knowledge. Everyone has to start somewhere, and while I would have preferred diving in on something a little lower on the stress scale, this opportunity presented itself.
It was much like when I installed my own sprinkler system. The hardest part was just launching into the project. I just needed a push in the right direction from someone with more experience. Thanks for being that person this time around.
-Fleemo
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Spend another $10 and buy a new relief valve as every water heater manufacturer recommends, or in some cases even includes.

The proper point is wherever the union in the gas line is, or possibly your old heater is connected by a flex hose with a fitting at one or both ends. If you have to ask about this, perhaps you should do a little more research before proceeding.
<...snipped...>
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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One thing you should never due is screw with gas. Get a plumber to replace it. It's cheap insurance.

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I don't disagree that this guy needs a plumber, but gas isn't all that critical. Because the pressure is so low sloppy work will often be good enough, and you can easily smell problems before they are serious. Yes, the penalty for screwing up is catastrophic, but it is not so easy to screw up.
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We are taking about *a novice* screwing with gas. Nothing could be more catastrophic, except, maybe, getting behind the wheel blind, stinking, drunk. He and his neighbors would be better off with a Pro.

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If he lived around here, he'd still know more than the plumber.
Bob

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You're nuts!! Wrong move, no house, maybe no family. MLD
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