not your typical paint stripper question... please read

I have a project actually requiring the reuse of paint AFTER it has been stripped with a chemical stripper. The problem I have is that I don't know how to redissolve the resulting sludge and chips that the stripper produces back into as close to the original paint as possible. I realize it wouldn't be perfect, but how can I thin and dissolve the paint stripper sludge?
Thanks, Blaine
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With oil paint, paint thinner or mineral spirits or terpintine, with Latex alcohol, will do. Or even soapy water with latex
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Blaine Whether wrote:

to paint. What on earth are you doing?
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Not looking for paint, although if I can get somewhat close to that it would be ok. I just need to dissolve the resulting sludge and chips into a solution. The thinner, the better. Acetone worked wonders at removing and dissolving paint in the past, but I am now up against paint that acetone doesn't dissolve. The paint stripper will do it, but always leaves a sludge and I need this dissolved too.
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Since trolls rarely respond to back to a thread, we must assume that you are serious.
It seems that at one time you removed or softened a finish with acetone and somehow reused what ever you removed. That finish was most likely lacquer which I guess you can redisolve and get some sort of useable finish.
OTOH, the stripper that you used really wreaks the paint at a molecular level. Its full of very nasty stuff that breaks up the polymer bonds created in the binder. It also contains wax that is used to keep the sludge from drying out.
So I guess you could distill out the nasty chemicals and then figure out how to separate out the pigments, re-grind them up really fine, remix in the proper binders and solvents and then put in what ever other additives are needed. Its all described here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paint.
Good luck
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Blaine Whether wrote:

first. Often takes more than one application, depending on amount and character of old finish being removed. Nasty stuff, so you need good ventilation and protection for other surfaces. With the final application, I use medium steel wool to scrub the surface, then a scraper to remove it, a last wipe with s.w. to get as much of the stripper as possible. I then use fine s.w. and mineral spirits to scrub off the last of the stripper (for wood or metal) and a last wipe with paper towel. You want to be sure to wipe off as much of the waste as possible, including fine little shreds of steel woo.l. Semi- paste stripper usually has wax as a thickener and the wax will interfere with new finish if left on. If you have left an initial application of stripper on a surface and it has dried, no problem. Just apply another thick coat, let it work for ......20-30 minutes or so. Best not to work with it in sun or wind, as it evaporates too quickly to get best results.
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Norminn wrote:

Trying to save the planet?
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Sort of like saying I'm trying to figure out a good seal to put around my head after I stick it into a groundhog hole, without saying what the overall objective is. Which says troll to me.
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wrote:

Strangest question I've seen here in years... assuming it's for real, the answer is: you can't. The resins in the paint have reacted with oxygen and are now fully cured, and are chemically different from their liquid form. No solvent can reverse that process. You can't unscramble an egg.
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