Not home repair, per set ... but voice recording home repairmen question

Page 1 of 2  
Do you know of a good voice activated voice recorder that uses AA batteries?
A while back, I had an air conditioning guy try to swindle me (he told me point blank after I paid him $200 to test my AC that I needed an entire new air conditioning system when the problem wasn't even related to the home AC. The problem was a bad circuit breaker in the main fuse panel!).
So, from now on, I want to RECORD these guys quoting me stuff, just in case.
My wife uses an Olympus VN-8100PC, is voice activated and lasts for about 24 hours - and the MP3 files can be transferred by USB to the PC - but the batteries are AAA (triple A) and I hate triple A things!
Do you know of a good voice activated voice recorder that uses AA batteries?
PS: Is it legal to stick a voice recorder in my pocket when talking to these guys? (I think it is but I'm not in the legal profession.) ------------------- Why you ask do I hate AAA? Because they give have the life for the same amount of money as AA and because I then have to stock yet another size battery when I'm already stocking C (kids toys) and D (flashlights) and 9V (smoke alarms), and my battery charger doesn't handle AAA batteries, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had to make secret recordings once at work. They told me to do it. I had to keep changing batteries. I had to do it for hours. I don't see you needing much time.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James Gagney wrote:

Believe it or not, in a few jurisdictions it IS illegal to record a conversation without both parties consent (California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Washington).
Best do a web search.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 21:33:24 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

So ask for their consent. As a contractor, I might think it a little strange, but it wouldn't be a deal breaker unless your plan is to lie.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 19 Sep 2012 03:07:30 +0000, thunder wrote:

I don't think you need consent to record a conversation between two people standing right next to each other - but the idea of asking them is similar to the tactic I used when calling phone support.
I 'tell' them I'm recording it - that way I ensure they give more honest answers, even though I'm not recording it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 21:33:24 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

I'm in California - and I don't see anything in the web that says you can't stick a recorder in your pocket to record man-on-the-street conversations.
Do you have a cite?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He just stated that he doesn't have a cite. "Absence of evidence ..."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Smitty Two wrote:

I did NOT say I didn't have a cite. Where'd you come up with that amazing claim?
From The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press: "Twelve states require, under most circumstances, the consent of all parties to a conversation. Those jurisdictions are California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Washington. Be aware that you will sometimes hear these referred to inaccurately as "two-party consent" laws. If there are more than two people involved in the conversation, all must consent to the taping." http://expertpages.com/news/taping_conversations.htm
Specifically:
California Penal Code #632 "(a) Every person who, intentionally and without the consent of all parties to a confidential communication, by means of any electronic amplifying or recording device, eavesdrops upon or records the confidential communication, whether the communication is carried on among the parties in the presence of one another or by means of a telegraph, telephone, or other device, except a radio, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500), or imprisonment in the county jail not exceeding one year, or in the state prison, or by both that fine and imprisonment..." http://law.onecle.com/california/penal/632.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My apologies, I misinterpreted an attribution. I read James' second paragraph (sentence) as a "reply" to his first paragraph, as though you had written his first paragraph.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 19 Sep 2012 16:05:06 +0000 (UTC), James Gagney wrote:

Most such laws pertain to telecommunications (wire tapping) devices. If the conversation is truly "in the public eye", then there is no need to ask permission. As expectation of privacy has been diminished.
That's how tv camera crews get away with video recording people being investigated by the cops.
Even though bad ass cops who don't know the laws will use their muscle and get you to stop recording.
Just record it. If it gets to court, let the judge decide.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which judge? The civil case judge if he sues the contractor and the judge won't allow the recording as evidence because it's illegal? Or the criminal judge after the contractor has criminal charges filed against him for making an illegal recording?
As was correctly pointed out, in a few states it's a criminal offense to make a recording as the OP intends to do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, but if you are using a multi- hundred/thousand device, such as an expensive camera, you risk getting it trashed by the cop and/or person you are recording. This is where, the new electronics really comes to your aid. They are making devices that are so small they can actually run them up your arteries and take pictures of your insides. It would be very easy to install such a device in your car that would record the cop while you are getting a ticket without his knowledge. After all, the cops themselves do it with their bait cars, and use the recordings in court against the car thief. (as well as sell them to the TV show producers)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Funny, I thought you said this was called "Public Domain".

Since when do tv camera crews record police investigations? What am I missing?

Clueless as usual, bullis.
Don't you have a dome home to build?
--
To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious and .invalid from my e-mail address.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Evan Platt wrote:

The cable networks have a bunch of reality shows of car repossessors and pawn shop arguments that depict people being themselves enguaged in their normal activities. I like the, "bait car" episodes where the car thieves are recorded while inside their stolen vehicle happily driving it away, before the cops shut it down and lock all the doors...:^)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes, look up the wiretapping laws...
You can make recordings of people when the devices used to make the recording are not concealed, when in public no consent is required... Covert recordings require two-party consent unless you want to be slapped with a wiretapping charge...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/19/12 1:21 PM, Evan wrote:

None of these statements is true in general. Anyone who wants to record conversations legally needs to check the laws of his jurisdiction.
Most laws pertain to wiretapping and not face-to-face conversation, but California's law is broader.
Some states require only one-party consent, so that you can record your own phone conversations; some states require two-party.
When consent is required and denied, it will be no defense to claim that the device was "not concealed."
Generally, there is no expectation of privacy in public, but California's law covers "confidential" conversations.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/19/2012 9:05 AM, James Gagney wrote:

Here is a good web site to use
http://www.citmedialaw.org/legal-guide/california-recording-law
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In any case, it is an unenforceable crime, so I will (and do) break it regularly. I purchased a Tascam GT-R1 recorder which is small enough to hide in my pocket, sensitive enough to pick up any and all conversations (and music) in the area, and has excellent fidelity. So the liberals stupid law can't be enforced anyway, and was made to be broken by all reasonable human beings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/19/12 3:44 PM, Bill Graham wrote:

The "liberals [sic] stupid law" is there to protect your privacy and everyone else's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know on what basis BG concludes it's a liberal law. It's a law in a few states. I don't know the history of how those laws were passed and by whom and I doubt BG does either. That kind of privacy issue, concerning what someone may or may not record, could just as well be argued by a conservative as well as a liberal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.