Non-standard tiled shower

We have a shower made entirely from tiles and the floor is a concrete slab. The beams aren't even securely on the floor, so minor wall pressure causes the seal on the tiles to crack. One obese neighbor (twenty nearly identical houses on my block) fell through the shower floor to the basement a decade ago. The house is wood frame built in 1965. What's worse, the dimensions aren't standard (less than a yard each wall) and the design is somewhat trapezoidal instead of truly rectangular. Adjacent to the shower are two closets and the main bathroom bathtub. It is also a big pain because it is one of the furthest points in the house from any outdoor entry door (so construction really inconveniences and messes up half the house).
First question: where do I find non-standard fiberglas (or similar material, eg PVC?) shower stalls and floors?
Next question: anyone have similar experiences they wish to share?
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snipped-for-privacy@at.BioStrategist.dot.dot.com wrote:

32 X 32 is a standard size. I would reframe the walls to match a fiberglass base that size. Consider adding some kind of stiffener or support system to the floor joists too.
Or....you can have custom pieces made from "cultured" marble or similar materials to exactly fit what you have. Or....shore up the floor and have someone float and tile a base.
Jim
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Or select the smallest standard size in fiberglass, take a slice out, i.e. cut to fit, rough up the back edges and glass/epoxy tape. The seam can be made fair with epoxy filler and a taped front face to provide a shiny surface during the cure.
Brian W
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non-standard shower sizes require custom tile. -B

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Hi, I;d recommend ripping up what you can & leaving in place what you can't easily remove. Then box upthe shower base & sides to 1800 high with say 8mm good quality plywood. You can stitch the edges together with copper wire or fix to existing walls or glue a corner timber cove to join. The point is to provide a clean reasonably well sealed "box" which you van then fibreglass over & make compleytely waterproof & strong. So long as the glass cloth is not forced into tight corners it can flex & need not be so thick as to be rigid. I would envisage two maybe three coats of 6 ounce cloth. you can do as much at a time as you can manage. When complete you can use a variety of resin based fillers to trowel out severe imperfections, you need it smooth & sounf enough to be sure it will remain waterproof & strong. Then fix ceramic tiles if you have minimised the shower wall flexure under live load, use generous amounts of flexible waterproof tile fixing glue. An alternative is to line with one of several available decorative waterproof vinyl flexible membranes that are available for similar purposes, can't recall trade names just now. Fair bit of work but manageable just proceed slowly & be aware the resin & glass handling is messy, don't use ytoo much resin, it should just penetrate the glass cloth & not be over wet which will result in the resin running down. Good luck Pete

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