Nobody was listening.

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This was published in National Geographic in October of 2004. The full text of the article is available at
http://www3.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0410/feature5 /
--------------------------------------------------------------------- It was a broiling August afternoon in New Orleans, Louisiana, the Big Easy, the City That Care Forgot. Those who ventured outside moved as if they were swimming in tupelo honey. Those inside paid silent homage to the man who invented air-conditioning as they watched TV "storm teams" warn of a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. Nothing surprising there: Hurricanes in August are as much a part of life in this town as hangovers on Ash Wednesday. But the next day the storm gathered steam and drew a bead on the city. As the whirling maelstrom approached the coast, more than a million people evacuated to higher ground. Some 200,000 remained, howeverthe car-less, the homeless, the aged and infirm, and those die-hard New Orleanians who look for any excuse to throw a party. The storm hit Breton Sound with the fury of a nuclear warhead, pushing a deadly storm surge into Lake Pontchartrain. The water crept to the top of the massive berm that holds back the lake and then spilled over. Nearly 80 percent of New Orleans lies below sea levelmore than eight feet below in placesso the water poured in. A liquid brown wall washed over the brick ranch homes of Gentilly, over the clapboard houses of the Ninth Ward, over the white-columned porches of the Garden District, until it raced through the bars and strip joints on Bourbon Street like the pale rider of the Apocalypse. As it reached 25 feet (eight meters) over parts of the city, people climbed onto roofs to escape it. Thousands drowned in the murky brew that was soon contaminated by sewage and industrial waste. Thousands more who survived the flood later perished from dehydration and disease as they waited to be rescued. It took two months to pump the city dry, and by then the Big Easy was buried under a blanket of putrid sediment, a million people were homeless, and 50,000 were dead. It was the worst natural disaster in the history of the United States.
When did this calamity happen? It hasn'tyet. But the doomsday scenario is not far-fetched. The Federal Emergency Management Agency lists a hurricane strike on New Orleans as one of the most dire threats to the nation, up there with a large earthquake in California or a terrorist attack on New York City. Even the Red Cross no longer opens hurricane shelters in the city, claiming the risk to its workers is too great.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc


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There are probably many people that would have loved to move away from NO or southern Louisiana; a lot of them probably knew that the possibility of disaster was there.
But most poor people don't have a choice of where to live.
This was published in National Geographic in October of 2004. The full text of the article is available at
http://www3.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0410/feature5 /
--------------------------------------------------------------------- It was a broiling August afternoon in New Orleans, Louisiana, the Big Easy, the City That Care Forgot. Those who ventured outside moved as if they were swimming in tupelo honey. Those inside paid silent homage to the man who invented air-conditioning as they watched TV "storm teams" warn of a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. Nothing surprising there: Hurricanes in August are as much a part of life in this town as hangovers on Ash Wednesday.
But the next day the storm gathered steam and drew a bead on the city. As the whirling maelstrom approached the coast, more than a million people evacuated to higher ground. Some 200,000 remained, however-the car-less, the homeless, the aged and infirm, and those die-hard New Orleanians who look for any excuse to throw a party.
The storm hit Breton Sound with the fury of a nuclear warhead, pushing a deadly storm surge into Lake Pontchartrain. The water crept to the top of the massive berm that holds back the lake and then spilled over. Nearly 80 percent of New Orleans lies below sea level-more than eight feet below in places-so the water poured in. A liquid brown wall washed over the brick ranch homes of Gentilly, over the clapboard houses of the Ninth Ward, over the white-columned porches of the Garden District, until it raced through the bars and strip joints on Bourbon Street like the pale rider of the Apocalypse. As it reached 25 feet (eight meters) over parts of the city, people climbed onto roofs to escape it.
Thousands drowned in the murky brew that was soon contaminated by sewage and industrial waste. Thousands more who survived the flood later perished from dehydration and disease as they waited to be rescued. It took two months to pump the city dry, and by then the Big Easy was buried under a blanket of putrid sediment, a million people were homeless, and 50,000 were dead. It was the worst natural disaster in the history of the United States.
When did this calamity happen? It hasn't-yet. But the doomsday scenario is not far-fetched. The Federal Emergency Management Agency lists a hurricane strike on New Orleans as one of the most dire threats to the nation, up there with a large earthquake in California or a terrorist attack on New York City. Even the Red Cross no longer opens hurricane shelters in the city, claiming the risk to its workers is too great.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc




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The government welfare system could have stopped paying them to live there. People go where the money is.
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On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 15:32:40 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Boy, you are smart! Money, money that's what everyone should be thinking.
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Wow......
Just out of idle curiousity - Where do you thing they should relocate too....?????????
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Shiver wrote:

Malibu.
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On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 19:40:07 +0000, Shiver wrote:

Martha's Vinyard or Nantucket. Teddy and John should be able to take a bunch.
--
Keith


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Heaven, God is waiting for you.
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wrote:

Higher ground.
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NapalmHeart wrote:

I sure wouldn't be able to tell where that was. I thought the whole city was below sea level.
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Most of it is, but there are a few high spots.
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http://hurricane.lsu.edu/floodprediction/NewOrleans/New_Orlean_Elevation2.jpg
that has detailed elevations, very revealing
The announcement that was widespread, that the whole city was going to fill to 10 -15' after the levee break, was wrong, but nobody seemed to be thinking clearly. The lake was at about 5' at the time, so only maybe 3 more feet max was going to come in. This lack of thinking may have hampered rescue efforts. Many areas were clearly not in danger .... from more flooding at least.
Bill
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<Bill> wrote in message wrote:

This is Turtle.
there was some parts of New Orleans with 8 feet of water in them but how high the water would get had nothing to do with the rescue effort for there was NO effort going on at all. after all of this is over you will find out there was NO efford to get the people out of N.O. at all. till Saturday when Bush and FEMA got permission from Blanco and the Mayor to start the federal Aid to start coming , there was no efford to get anybody out of anywhere. Bush and FEMA ask the Governor Blanco and the Mayor of N.O. if they wanted federal Aide to move in and bush and FEMA was told stay out we will handle this. If the Governor and Mayor could have handled it theirself. the State and Governor would be getting the $14Billion check to do the job of cleaning up, but if FEMA and Federal Aid come in the money would be used by them to clean up and fix the city. The governor want that money to devid up and just do very little as possible and to keep the rest of it. the Governor and Mayor tried for a good retirement stab at the money and lost big time. In a few months you will see or hear about this stab at fame but failed.
TURTLE
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TURTLE wrote:

against them. I thought they were just incompetant. Guess I didn't consider someone could be that inhuman. SueK
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jJohn Klausner wrote:

He is not right. He's assigned motive where there was none.
In essence, they were simply incompetent and ill-prepared and apparently did not know the protocol to use in requesting Federal assistance or at least did not follow it.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Check this out:
http: //www.nytimes.com/2005/09/05/national/nationalspecial/05vegas.html?oref=login
SueK
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Will Brown get fired or resign? No.
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FDR wrote:

He should go, but not as the scapegoat.
The main responsibility for the deaths is local. The Mayor, the Emergency Director appointed by the Mayor (Ebbert), and Gov. Blanco.
Brown never had a chance to do as much damage as those three, so laying all the blame on him is stupid.
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You are right, the Democrats were responsible. In fact Bush in his interviewed, praised Michael Brown standing beside him saying he's doing a good job. doing a good job on TV.
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Dave Jefford wrote:

The ones responsible happen to be Democrats. I'm not saying that because they are Democrats, I'm saying it because they screwed up.
This reminds me of a baseball game I played in, IIRC 4th grade. I struck out with bases loaded, ending the game. One of the other players blamed me for losing the game, but shut up pretty quick when I pointed out that I was the third out and he was the second. Bases were loaded for him, too. What I did would not have mattered had he cleaned the bases instead of striking out as well.
Why are you trying to blame Bush and Brown for losing the game? Had Blanco, Nagin, and Ebbert had done their jobs, Bush and Brown would not have to be as perfect as you seem to be demanding.
Blanco is still paralyzed with moral panic.
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