No more auto GPS (as we've come to know it)

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http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13746_7-57401786-48/fed-driver-distraction-guidelines-make-navigation-unusable /
I just bought a high end TomTom yesterday at a yard sale for $15, almost like new.
I understand the argument the way some of these screens are set up. Mine is just to the left of my rear view mirror on the windshield of my truck. It helps me get into the correct lane. It tells me the name of the street coming up so I don't have to look through a maze of light poles, people, cars, and overgrown shrubbery, and I just love it.
For me, it actually helps make this old fart of a driver a better old fart of a driver. Now, if the screen was down on the console, or dash, I would think that is a bad idea. But for me, it takes a second or two to get a lot of information from the rear view mirror and Tom Tom. Now Wifey will have one on her side of the mirror, as she is always trying to horn in on mine, and she panics when it says "TURN RIGHT AHEAD", but it is two miles before I'm supposed to turn. Anyway, we will put 50-100 miles on the truck in a weekend going from property to property, and these help US immensely.
As with anything, I can see how it would be a problem for others.
BTW, Clark County, NV's new anti hand held phone law is in effect now, with a $250 fine. I still see people yakking on them, a motorcycle police officer being one of them. And I understand in California, you cannot have any GPS device on your windshield. I guess I have to use the weighted sandbag thing that goes on the dash, but really, that's more dangerous to look down at then the other one that's up there where I'm looking anyway.
Guess Congress was having a slow day.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

Wouldn't a "Heads Up" display be handy?
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On 3/26/2012 10:46 AM, HeyBub wrote:

your car doesn't have one already? they're pretty common in vettes in the last 4-5 years. i imagine that other cars have them too.
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On 3/26/2012 1:27 PM, chaniarts wrote:

For some unknown reason (and I would really like to know why) the only vehicles that I have ever seen that in is Corvettes and Pontiacs which of course are no longer made. I had that feature (not GPS, just speed, etc.) in a Corvette and a Pontiac Grand Prix and they work great!
Don
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Not familiar with that one.
Steve
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On Tue, 27 Mar 2012 12:38:29 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

confusing. "Drrrr, I was lookin' at the pretty numbers and didn't see the kid run out in the street half a mile up."
I've seen prototype HUDs that essentially improve the contrast of the scene ahead, particularly highlighting things that "aren't right". They're nothing like HUDs used by fighter pilots. They confuse even experienced fighter pilots.
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<snip>

I use one of those weighted bags for my GPS and I really like it. It also makes it easy to place out of sight when the car is parked.
--
Jim Rusling
More or Less Retired
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Come on people. the author of this article even provided a link to the proposal he has so badly misinterpreted...
https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2012/02/24/2012-4017/visual-manual-nhtsa-driver-distraction-guidelines-for-in-vehicle-electronic-devices#p-3
Principle 4.1: Visual information ***NOT RELATED TO DRIVING*** {emphasis added) that is likely to distract the driver significantly (e.g., video and continuously moving images and automatically scrolling text) should be disabled while the vehicle is in motion or should be only presented in such a way that the driver cannot see it while the vehicle is in motion.
It mentions the concept in several other places, each time making it clear that this DOES NOT apply to navigational aids. It's about things like TV's and DVD players and ads or news feeds on your GPS for instance, but not a moving map (I'm sure someone will try to make that argument, but that's clearly not the intent.)
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wrote:

I owned a GPS for a while. I paid some pretty big bucks to buy the piece of shit. I think I got $5 when I sold it at our rummage sale, but I was glad to be rid of the annoying thing. I've been driving since the late 60's and always used a map with few problems, other than in constructions zones. Sure I'd get confused and lost sometimes, but who hasn't. I thought that GPS would save me those 3 or 4 hours per year that I get lost when traveling, and save me $35 a year on wasted gas, thus it would pay itself off after about 4 or 5 years. Boy was I wrong. That f#%^i&* piece of crap was so far off that it was virtually useless. Yea, in a larger city it was helpful, but try to use it in a rural area, and it became worse than useless.
The POS lead me 70 miles the wrong way one of the first times I used it. I was going to a friends wedding in a small rural town. I missed the whole wedding, wasted over 3 hours and $25 worth of gas due to that GPS. That POS took me down the most back roads, where some of them didn't even have gravel on them, and insisted that I take those horrible routes regardless what settings I used. On the way to that wedding, it actually directed me down a cattle path and into someone's cattle pasture, yet still claiming it was an actual road. I finally got out my map, and found I had gone 70 miles the wrong way, and I had to turn around and backtrack the whole way, plus another 30 or so miles to get to my destination.
Add to that the annoying vocal demands of that GPS, which irritated me to no end. The day I got in the car and pulled out of my driveway, and it said "wrong way, turn around when possible", was the day I tossed it in the rummage sale box. I will never own another of those annoying things. I got my road atlas and state maps. That's all I need. If I buy a car with a built in GPS, I'll cut the power wire to the damn thing.
By the way, to eliminate all car accidents, it's not a matter of removing car electronics, just remove the engine. That will guarantee no more crashes, not to mention saving a fortune in gas costs.
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Mine just guided my low-clearance wheelchair van through a huge truck park (to save about a 100' in normal road travel) with huge, truck-sized speed bumps arrayed along along the roadway as far as the eye could see. Fortunately, I stopped and since I generally knew where I was, backed up and listened to it whine about deviating from the bottom-out alleyway route until I got to the next junction point.
I would have liked the option to answer the unit's "You're speeding" with a "STFU for X minutes." What a nag. My first unit took me to the middle of a cornfield instead of the medical park I was looking for. Their best use seems to be getting you home when you're lost. They "know" where home is (and so do you) so even if the maps aren't very detailed for your area, it will at least keep you pointed towards home. I'd sell mine, too, if it weren't for that feature.
I've read that all the gains made in taking drunk drivers off the road in the last 50 years has been quickly undone by the new "driving drunk" - texting while driving. I see it so often it spooks me. In S. Korea, I think, out of work people are paid a bounty to catch miscreants like texting drivers on film.
-- Bobby G.
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news:455ce899-3b17-4e74-bf72-

I assume that a) if you use them often enough to really learn their quirks and b) have a good, frequently updated unit that doesn't drag you down logging roads and blind alleys (-: that you can get by.,

I still get freaked when I am sitting in a huge shopping center and the GPS shows nothing - no roads, no buildings, no message "Here Be Dragons!"

Sanyo and Maylong. That could explain it. I really don't use them at all, so I didn't want to spend a fortune.

It is pretty useful for finding my way home when I get lost.
-- Bobby G.
my first garmin cost over 650 bucks, it paid for itself in a matter of months......
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I can see how the additional traffic feature could be very useful in metropolitan areas and holiday driving. What did yours cost?
-- Bobby G.
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On Tue, 27 Mar 2012 19:20:54 -0400, "Robert Green"

Traffic comes on my cell phone's navigation app. It takes a digital connection, though, which isn't a problem in cities where it's needed.
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You obviously never got held up in the wilds of some state because the two semis came together on the rural Interstate. I have had my Tom Tom tell me about backups in the middle of nowhere, although I think that tends to be more useful in areas with a strong 511 system statewide.
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
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I have, but as you say, it depends on the reporting which in the wilds is nonexistent.
I've used my cell phone a bit more around here, over the past few days. I'm not sure what the problem is but I've become more disenchanted with it. In the far burbs (of Atlanta) it (the navigation feature) seems to lock up constantly. If I cancel the navigation and start over it does fine, so I don't think it's losing connection. I may have to buy SWMBO another GPS. :-( ...and this time it WON'T be a Magellan.
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I haven't had any major problems with TomTom except for a couple areas around the Miami Cruise Port. The streets are a little cramped with big buildings and it seems as though it loses lock with enough satellites. Of course, if you ever driven the MCP, the signage isn't exactly the greatest, either. So, I was doubly lost
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Some of the "GPS" chipset manufacturers are adding GLONASS and European satellite receivers so they can "see" more satellites in the "urban canyons". Apparently it works quite well. These will probably show up first in the integrated car (head) units.
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I love the part about traffic features. Kept me out of a couple major jams roaming on Interstates. I, too have some concerns with them in rural areas. Although I find if I keep it on fastest instead of shortest route, they tend to be a little more comprehensible. I also like the part where it tells you which lane to get in about a mile ahead of time. Especially useful driving through ATL in general and other places where the Interstate-to-Interstate interchange runs off to the left instead of the right.
I still find some interesting quirks. We were out on the Indiana Uplands Wine Trail last year with a group and we were in two cars. For one winery, the two GPSs (one Tom Tom and one Garmin) indicated two different places about 30 miles apart for the same address. Looked around for a bit and finally used an older version (the MarkI Gas Station) and found it right across the street about half way between the two. This was on the built up outskirts of Anderson and not in the rural areas.
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of
I might end up having to get a new one at some point. I like the Maylong's small size and 16GB storage. I've got music and videos loaded for long waits in doctor's offices. In the DC area, alternate routes clog up about 5 minutes after the main routes clog up so getting traffic updates mostly means knowing that you're screwed no matter what.

One of my major peeves. Left hand high-speed exits on main interstates. It's like asking for last minute four lane dives at speed. We have one on the next Beltway exit over and if you don't pay attention to the people making the four lane dive to the left, you can get creamed in a heartbeat. I remember a friend in an Austin that had truck tire marks all along the right side of her car as a trucker, who didn't even see her, pushed her off onto the shoulder trying to make a dive across four lanes to get to the left exit. Boy was SHE freaked out.

So far I've been "escorted" to two empty fields by my GPS's. I've also been to areas that just show up as blank on the GPS but have been there for years. Go figure. Still, I am always impressed just a little when I turn the little bugger on and suddenly it knows where I am!
-- Bobby G.
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On 3/27/2012 7:20 PM, Robert Green wrote:

It is a Garmin Nuvi 1450LMT and cost about $125 on sale at Best Buy on line before Christmas. It has a 5 inch screen and you can get a 4 incher, something like 1350LMT for about $15 less. I bought one of the latter for my son's birthday as he was calling us occasionally while in his car for us to get on line and give him directions.
My wife has an older Nuvi without maps and traffic and using it last year to go to a friends wedding anniversary celebration it worked great but a bridge was out for repair and we had to turn off the gps as it kept wanting to steer us back to the outage. Not sure how my new one would react to this situation.
Roads don't change that often but businesses and other points of interest do. A map upgrade currently costs about $75 so the lifetime maps option is a good thing.
When you first get the Nuvi, you plug it into your computer and register with Garmin and they update maps and will send you a notice when new maps are available. Someone in the Garmin ng said this could happen 4 times a year.
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