no housewrap...

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As part of that design, I use building paper and housewrap, carefully considering what is appropriate for each situation.
OK, so where is #15 felt better than Tyvek, considering that it leaks air?
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> As part of that > design, I use building paper and housewrap, carefully considering what is > appropriate for each situation. > > OK, so where is #15 felt better than Tyvek, considering that it leaks air?
Under asphalt shingles, to wrap steel columns under a brick or other exterior veneer.
> >
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3D Peruna wrote:

I don't find anything to disagree with you. The use of new materials dictates using new construction techniques and designs. Older carpentry, relied on gravity to get rid of water, e.g., window sills that slope down on the outside, window and door frames that are constructed to channel flow water to the outside if it does get past the siding, specific overlaps, etc. and not on materials. My main gripe is that new construction often ignores water flow and relies on caulka and materials to prevent water entry. The problem is that caulks often fail, and if the openings are not constructed to deflect water outward, that is a prescription for rotting. I'm not saying all old construction designs are good. Some can't be used because of the cost in todays environment, others are dangerous, etc., but many remain worthwhile or as a backup to more modern materials. The problem with many modern materials, is they seemed to become approved, even mandated, before proven and are later found to be problematic and can contribute to indoor environmental problems.
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<snip>

That is also why I don't rely on all modern materials...I'd prefer lapped building paper to housewrap in most situations. I also detail using gravity to help manage moisture. It's part of the whole package. Overlapping flashings, pitched sills, etc. are all necessary. Caulk & Tyvek aren't part of the solution (in fact, caulk should never be part of the water management system - you can use it, but don't rely on it to keep the water out). It's also understanding the strengths and weaknesses of each material and appropriate application of those materials.
It's intelligent thinking about the issues and using common sense (if that's even available anymore).
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