no heat tonight

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On Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 2:19:00 PM UTC-5, Tony944 wrote:

How is it that one poster can be so consistently wrong on so many very basic things and still be alive?
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"trader_4" wrote in message
On Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 2:19:00 PM UTC-5, Tony944 wrote:

How is it that one poster can be so consistently wrong on so many very basic things and still be alive?
Not to be confused with Liquefied natural gas.
************************************************** LPG minibuses in Hong Kong Liquefied petroleum gas or liquid petroleum gas (LPG or LP gas), also referred to as simply propane or butane, are flammable mixtures of hydrocarbon gases used as fuel in heating appliances, cooking equipment, and vehicles.
It is increasingly used as an aerosol propellant and a refrigerant[citation needed], replacing chlorofluorocarbons in an effort to reduce damage to the ozone layer. When specifically used as a vehicle fuel it is often referred to as autogas.
Varieties of LPG bought and sold include mixes that are primarily propane (C 3H 8), primarily butane (C 4H 10) and, most commonly, mixes including both propane and butane. In the northern hemisphere winter, the mixes contain more propane, while in summer, they contain more butane.[1][2] In the United States, primarily two grades of LPG are sold: commercial propane and HD-5. These specifications are published by the Gas Processors Association (GPA)[3] and the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM).[4] Propane/butane blends are also listed in these specifications.
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On Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 3:26:37 PM UTC-5, Tony944 wrote:

What does buses in Hong Kong have to do with this:
Clare: In North America it's either Natural gas or Propane. Tony: You can call it as you want however it is Butane Butane is used for domestic heating and cooking same goes for bots and campers and not the Propane.
I know of people using propane for heating, WH, cooking. I see people here with problems relating to propane for that. I see people complaining about the cost of propane. I see propane trucks driving down the highway. I see propane used for all the home outdoor grills that run off tanks. Butane? It exists in the world of camping and comes in little cans. Home use, for heating/cooking, maybe somewhere, by somebody, but it's surely the exception.
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I don't know, Tony. Answer that question for yourself. I had my propane fuel licence for automotive propane years ago. I've also used both propane and butane torches. I've also lived where butane was the common "bottled gas" - and we never had freezing temperatures.
Good luck starting a butane heater when it's 10 degees F. No problem with propane.
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NOT the same as Propane.
Although propane is more popular, butane continues to be used as a fuel source. It is used as a fuel in stoves, cigarette lighters and even in aerosol sprays as a propellant. Besides, butane is cheaper than propane, but comparatively, it is more difficult to use, so it is not very commonly available and not many gadgets, devices are designed to be used with butane as fuel source.
But you should know that butane is more efficient than propane when used as fuel. If same volume of butane and propane is burned at temperature above freezing, butane will end up providing 12% more energy than propane. Thus, butane can be the preferred choice when it is available in adequate amounts since it is energy-efficient and also has an advantage of cheaper price.
Unlike butane, propane is available more easily in small portable tanks and is used widely for heating houses. It is used as a fuel in gas barbeques, lanterns and camping stoves. Automobiles run on liquefied petroleum gas or LPG which is made by mixing propane with other fuels like butylene, propylene or butane.
When the fuel needs to be stored for a long time, propane is a better choice than butane. It stores well in variable weather conditions and even below freezing temperature will not affect the storage conditions of propane because of its propetries. When people need to go camping, hiking or mountain climbing, especially in cold weather, propane is preferred over butane as a fuel for cooking. Since propane gas is odorless, leaks are harder to detect. For this reason, ethanethiol is mixed with propane so that leaks can be easily detected.
Butane, C4H10, boils at 30.2F, Propane, C3H8. boils at -43.6F.
BIG difference.
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On Thu, 21 Jan 2016 21:29:51 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I know all too well that a butane cigarette lighter will not light when it's very cold. If I leave a lighter in my car in cold weather I have to hold it in my hand for several minutes, or by a car's heater output before that lighter will light. The flint will throw sparks, but no flame.
Another thing about those lighters. NEVER let one fall down the defrost vent opening on the dashboard. When the heater gets hot enough, the lighters literally explode. More than once I was driving and suddenly there's a loud bang, and chunks of plastic are flying all over the car. Talk about having a panic attack. Especially the first time it happened. There was never any flame, but it's still frightening. Fortunatly it never happened when I was in heavy traffic. Could have caused an accident.
I wont happen again, I fastened a piece of 1/4" hardware cloth (screen) over those vents. Just embedded the screen in silicone caulk around the edge of the vent. It's not just the exploding lighters, but pens, pencils and all sorts of other stuff would fall down those vents. I found that after one exploding lighter blew the hose off the vent under the dash.
I always wondered why they dont put some sort of screen on those vents at the factory.
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On Friday, January 22, 2016 at 3:52:20 AM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrot e:

...this is a good thing! (⊙ヮ⊙)
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On Friday, January 22, 2016 at 4:52:20 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

While on the subject of vents and screens, most of the condensing furnaces around here have either no screen on the intake and exhaust pipes or at most a very rough one, eg 1/2" openings. I have a Rheem and the install manual specifically says not to place any kind of screen on the openings. I think they are probably worried about them freezing up, icing over. But you would think that it would raise all kinds of problems, eg mice or similar deciding to take up residence in the pipes or worse, the furnace during summer.
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On 1/22/2016 8:44 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I got a no heat call, about three years ago. The mousie had got in the exhaust, and chewed some wires. The stench was extreme. The wires were relatively easy to repair.
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc posted for all of us...

I call BS on Homo Gay
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Tekkie

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