No heat during blackout?

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I had a 90 minute power loss last week and I noticed that my Weil McLain oil fired boiler did not going on for the entire period. Up until then I was under the foolish assumption that if there was a blackout in the middle of winter my hot water boiler would continue to heat the house. How can I protect against an extended power outage in the middle of winter leaving me without power. Even if I had a portable generator my electric oil pump is hard wired so there is nothing to plug in. What do other people do in this situation?
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Get a transfer panel put in you can get a 6 circuit pre wired for about 2-300
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Assuming you need 120v to run your furnace?...
You feed power from the generator outlet into your house by plugging it into an house outlet. That outlet will feed the breakers through the panel box. Make a 20A cord with two male ends.
IMPORTANT and LEGALLY REQUIRED. ALSO MORALLY SANE. You are required to have a "TRANSFER SWITCH". This disconnects your panel box from the meter while your generator is running. Besides the generator feeding your house, it will feed power back to the "pole" or wherever. If someone is working on the line trying to restore power and thinks the line is dead, your generator could hurt/kill them. You would be liable. And even if the lineman scenario didn't happen, I think things would get nasty when the power came back on and the generator was running too.
For 120v, the generator must be plugged into an outlet that is on the same side of the panel box bus (not physical side of breakers) as the furnace. Power will be supplied to all house outlets/hardwired things on that side of the bus. Make sure everything is turned off so it doesn't bog down the generator. Someone running like a hair dryer will bog it down and maybe trip generator breaker.
No personal experience but I've heard you can't plug the generator into a house GFCI outlet like say in a garage.
DO NOT have anything on in the house that is 220v. It will only get 120 and burn stuff up.
I've never done this part but if you do this with a generator that has 220 output and can plug into a 220 house outlet, you should get power to both sides of the panel box and all house outlets.
Hopefully some more savy electrical people in this group will shoot holes or add good info to this post. This is welcomed from my POV so no one gets hurt and you don't cause any damage on your end.
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You dont plug it into a house outlet-backfeed a house, a transfer panel has its own exterior box and plug. My 7500w uses 4 prong, 8ga wire, weatherproof box, Look at a Generac Transfer Panel kit, its all included at about 2-300. But if you want real cheap put the boiler on a plug in outlet and unplug the boiler and gop to the generator with an extension cord. Backfeeding a house is dumb and probably illegal
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oh more costly but nice, a natural gas or propane automatic back up generator, will run most stuff in house for about 4 grand.
if your away and a major storm takes out power in freezing weather your entire home could freeze, ruin bolier, burst pipes etc.
such things can happen and today power companies take much longer to restore service, and more storms appear to be occuring.
auto backup is looking more attractive
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If you live in an area that gets at least one 24hr outage a year then it might be a good option in just the food you could loose in your frige and other apliances needing power. But I wonder on the life and cost to maintain these basicly lower grade exterior units. They automaticly cycle every month or so, there is an added cost for that, and oil changes, battery. Having a generator and all the electronics stored outdoors cant be good over a period of 10 years for the relays, bearings, connections, and any component that will over many years be affected by weather and corrode. I imagine alot of no starts after 5-10 years where a repairman is necessary. I keep my portable in a garage where its not affected by rain and high humidities. If it does not start one day there is no provision to plug in a portable to an exterior box on the auto units, I bet its alot extra. I just have a simple weatherproof exterior box any portable could be plugged into if my gen breaks, and a 6 circuit with 2 V meter transfer switch. At least getting a 2-300$ transfer switch and box instaled might be a better idea to do now rather than buying a Gen first. I can always borrow one for a few hours or get a cheap 400$ one at 3am at wallmart. 4000 is alot and I guess maintenance and testing could cost 50-200$ a year, and how long do those units realy last or cost over 10-20 years, with salt air not long, but for many they are great.
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That was impossible during the storm.
or get a cheap 400$ one at 3am at wallmart.
Absolutely no store had any. HD had some scheduled to come in. The day people were told the truck would arrive, there was a large crowd and a couple of local police cars to discourage any issues.
Good hearted people/businesses were donating some to the farmers in NY to keep their animals alive & milked.
Many scumbags were going way out of the northeast where they were able to latch on to a bunch, load on a truck and drive back to these desparate farmers to offer them like $500 generators at rumored $4000-5000 because they knew farmers losses without them was much more costly.

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Illegal? Not where I was anyway. Power company said as long as I was disconnected from the meter it was not illegal. I was in northern VT just south of Montreal in the January 1998 ice storm. No power for 5 days. Few miles north and they were out for weeks. Montreal had huge transmission towers dropping.
I had limited power backfeeding. Enough to keep furnace running, some lights, frig, microwave, etc. Dumb? Maybe, maybe not. You try no power for a week in the middle of winter in that location.
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Years ago, I cut an electrical cord off a junk appliance. Three wire cord. When the power was off, four days, in year 2003, I wired the furnace to a power cord, for temporary use.
Switch off the breaker, to the furnace. Side of the furnace, is a connection box. Open the box. Remove the wire nuts, and wire the wires coming out of the furnace to the wires on the power cord. Match the colors. Black, white, green. Run an extension cord under the front door, and plug into the generator. Securely chain the generator to a tree, and a mean pit bull dog. Generators are a high theft item during blackouts.
The generator will power the boiler. When the electric comes back on, reconnect the wires. Close the junction box, and then turn the breaker on.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Joe wrote:

The simplest and least expensive remedy is to install a double pole double throw switch as the oil burner service switch. That is the switch located quite close to the oil burner that the service technician would use to cut off the power supply to the equipment during servicing. The common contacts of the switch supply the oil burner. The switch can be center off, thrown to a flanged inlet that will except a regular extension cord from the generator, or thrown to connect to the supply conductors coming from the panel were the branch circuit Over Current Protective Device is installed. A flanged inlet is a plug blade assembly rigidly mounted for installation in a box.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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And where does one find such a switch?
I can find DPDT switches in "electronics" but they don't have the "form factor" as your regular AC switches.
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John Gilmer wrote:

Any electrical supply house will order you one for about twenty dollars for the public and somewhat less to an electrician that they deal with regularly. They're a stock item at RV repair and parts outlets but they price them outrageously. Leviton # 1286 is one twenty ampere model that is readily ordered through a supply house.
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Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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My power cord was free. The wire nuts are already in the junction box. I already own the extension cord.
So, a transfer switch and more wiring is less expensive?
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Perhaps I should have said the simplest and least expensive code compliant method.
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Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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There are problems with portable generators; they have to be regularly maintained and the fuel kept fresh. (People have a tendency to store them away and forget about them).
So the alternative is a portable kerosene or propane heater.
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Jonathan Grobe Books
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I agree. A lot of people fail to handle those generators, even fixed units, properly and either have serious safety issues or spend a lot of money and find it will not work when needed.
BTW be very careful of those portable heaters. Follow all the instructions.
--
Joseph Meehan

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On Tue, 27 May 2008 06:37:53 +0000 (UTC), Jonathan Grobe

Careful. Carbon monoxide poisoning and fire hazard always to consider.
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wrote:

yeah, if U R stupid.
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Which relatively high numbers of people are. Never hurts to remind people.
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LOL!!! Ain't that the truth!

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