nitrogen gas in cans

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I wonder why some company doesn't begin to sell compressed nitrogen gas in spray cans, complete with a tube as found on many lubricant cans. For foods, a blast of Nitrogen into a zip lock baggie would help keep food from oxidizing, while a blast into a paint can before resealing might lengthen the storage life of the paint.
Am I wrong in my assumptions that it would do this?
--
Nonny


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Nonny wrote:

way to suck out the normal-ratio air out at the same time, or there would still be plenty of oxygen in there. Hence all the vacuum-baggie food sealing machines. I find that manually deflating the zip-lock baggie as I seal it (by careful folding and pushing) helps prolong the time the food stays tolerable. Makes a big difference with cheese and such. (Alright, I confess- I live alone, so I suck the last bit of air out with my mouth, and dog down the zipper with my teeth.)
No good suggestions about the paint, other than the 'store it upside down' idea. I seldom bother, but don't paint that often, and store the latex paint in a heated basement, so I have never really had any problems anyway.
-- aem sends...
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Thanks for the honesty.....I was wondering why I couldn't squeeze the air out by hand and had to resort to sucking the air out. :)
cheers Bob
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there IS(was?) a company that sells compressed nitrogen in spray cans. it was made for filling opened paint cans so a skin would not form on the surface.I couldn't find it with Google,though. ISTR it was also sold in camera stores,to preserve photo chemicals.
you also can get paintball bottles filled with nitrogen. then there's the adapter/regulator to use the bottles with air tools.

I insert a soda straw,nearly close the zipper,then suck the air out,then pullout the straw with my teeth and close the zipper fully.

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 07:20:32 -0600, Jim Yanik wrote:

http://www.bloxygen.com
Argon, not nitrogen.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
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Works even better if you use a soda straw.
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Technically you are correct. Practically, the spray cans are pressure limited (70PSI or some such?) so the gas volume is gone in one blast. Liquid propellants are used to produce longer lasting operating pressure for spray products, various Freons, propane among others. Using crude arithmetic, a 2.5" x 6" spay can at 9 cubic inches will hold about 45 cubic inches of gas at STP given 70 PSI initially. So maybe a half dozen Ziplocks might be serviced. Not too good a return on your expenditure. Figure out a way to keep nitrogen pellets around at -200 degrees C and you could have a neat product.
Joe
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wrote:

Interesting. How about nitrogen in a MIG-sized bottle under high pressure, a pressure regulator, electric valve and 1/4" PEX tube run from the garage to the kitchen and shop?
--
Nonny


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Go to your local wine purveyor and buy a can of "Private Preserve". It is a mix of inert gases including nitrogen that is used to spray into opened wine bottles to displace the oxygen and extend the life of the bottle of wine. Altough I have a vacuum cap and seal unit that I find works VERY well instead. Also, try dry ice. Place a unit of dry ice on some paper towel on the top of your stored food and place the lid on lightly so that the evaporating gas can escape. When the dry ice block has melted (evaporated), tightly seal the container.
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Air is about 78% nitrogen, the issue is removing the oxygen so you need to pull a vacume first. They charge alot extra to inflate tires wirh nitrogen, but how do they remove the oxygen, I dont think they do at all.
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On 2/24/2010 7:38 AM, ransley wrote:

I guess it depends where you buy tires. The local evil mom & pop place doesn't charge a lot more or even more for that matter. They have a unit similar to this in the garage:
http://www.ntxtools.com/network-tool-warehouse/RTI-NTF-60.html
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By design a tire cant be fully deflated of air, air is 78% nitrogen, so what is the true percentage of nitrogen in tires filed with nitrogen, it will still contain alot of oxygen. But I guess if it works its worth it.
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And I'd say it's just another scam to get more money out of unwitting consumers. Nitrogen would seem to have no compelling advantage. Supposedly it means tires are less susceptable to pressure change with ambient temp change, nitrogen will leak out slower, etc. If you have enough sense to check your tire pressure regularly, none of that matters. And if you don't, then I'd say nitrogen is a poor substitute.
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On 2/24/2010 10:01 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Works for me. One of our vehicles has always had issues with slow tire leaks. The wheels are clean with no rust and aren't bent. I had four new tires tires installed at the local evil mom & pop tire place last year and they used nitrogen this time (at no additional charge) and now the slow leaks are gone.
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George wrote:

New tires and more careful mounting eliminated the leaks, not nitrogen.
Nitrogen isn't really a scam per-se, more of a distortion. Folks found that racing teams were using nitrogen for it's advantages when used in low volume race tires running *hot* at a couple hundred miles per hour and figured if the racers used it they should too. The reality is it is of no benefit for normal vehicles with normal tires operated at normal highway speeds.
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The new tires fixed it not the nitrogen. Ive read tire test reviews just on leak amounts, Michelin scored best for holding air. I think even CR published a test on tires that hold pressure.
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George wrote:

Aluminum rims, or steel? Every car I have ever had with aluminum rims had problems with slow leaks during cold weather, until I had tire guy paint the rims with some magic goop as he put the tires on. I suspect that is what solved your problem as well- their installer just did it correctly without prompting. Never had the same problem with steel rims. I'd never pay extra for aluminum rims, but since I buy used cars only, I don't get a choice.
-- aem sends...
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On 2/24/2010 7:09 PM, aemeijers wrote:

They are steel. I choose steel to try to prevent issues such as the slow leaks. The correct way is to mount a tire without magic goop. I saw them mount the tires and no "magic goop" was used.
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Dont guess it could be because of the new tires, valve stems and cleaning the rims?
Jimmie
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On 2/25/2010 12:07 PM, JIMMIE wrote:

Possible, it isn't a scientific test. The wheels are clean and the valve stems were also replaced the last time I had new tires installed and there were still slow leaks.
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