NiCd vs. NiMh

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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

A load doesn't hold a charge. The only thing I know that can be said to be charged to 1 volt is a capacitor. If your batteries are marked in microfarads, they must be capacitors.

I've seen it, but only with voltage-regulated chargers. I quit trying to charge nickel batteries that way long ago. On a charger, a battery that you know isn't fully charged may show the same voltage you expect of a charged one, and trickle charging shortens the service life of a nickel battery.
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You didn't answer the question.

You are truly clueless.

Clueless. It take a regulator?????
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Your question is gibberish. If a 1000 amp source puts 1 volt across the load, the load is 1 milliohm.

A load doesn't hold a charge.

Without a regulator, a 1.4 VRMS transformer with a half-wave silicon rectifier should yield similar results, but that transformer would be useless as a dumb charger. You said it was a dumb charger.
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wrote:

Clueless
Ever hear of counter electromotive force........Clueless

A dumb charger can be anything that has no feedback loop.......Clueless.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

You must be talking about 1 VAC on an inductive load. What does this have to do with your dumb charger?

Feedback would be useless without a regulator. A regulator would be useless without feedback. When you talk about dumb chargers, you must mean chargers without regulators.
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AC or DC it doesn't matter. Electrical laws still apply. In this case when a battery charges it creates a higher and higher counter electromotive force. Eventually the counter force equals the source and no current flows. This even applies to a charger rated at 1000 amps.
Read up on EMF. You may learn something http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromotive_force
snip

Your point????

Do I have to repeat? "A dumb charger can be anything that has no feedback loop.......Clueless."
Getting lost? Oh, I forgot. You are clueless.
And now you are reverting to being just a common troll. Say something on point or intelligent and I may respond. Otherwise have a good day. I've proven my point.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

You said "counter electromotive force." That applies only to inductance.
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wrote:

It works for me, and it will work for anyone else because.........it's a very slow charge. Normally these dumb slow chargers will take 16 hours to charge a battery. When hooked up to a timer it will take 8 days to charge. Once fully charged the battery can stay connected to the charging system because no possible damage to the battery can occur when hooked to such a slow charge for only two hours a day.
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On Jul 4, 9:32am, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

For my RC cars and a dumb charger I used to measure voltage, when it dropped the slightest amount they were charged, that is also when they get warm, but temp is hard to monitor when batteries are in a charger that produces heat itself. The best chargers would have to measure voltage and compute when peaking occurs by voltage drop, the temp method I dont trust. My sony cameras came with good inexpensive chargers for NimH
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ransley wrote:

Both my NiMH chargers monitor for the voltage change. I don't think it's foolproof. Occasionally over the years when charging seemed to take too long, my cells felt too hot. If I were charging manually, I would scan the pack with an infrared thermometer. That should show when the temperature of a cell rose.
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Mine get warm but its the charger itself thats warm also, in RC packs the pack is outside the charger so the chargers heat cant affect them. You could attatch leads of a V meter, I place the thin probe in as im placing the AA cell in my cheap sony charger, then you can monitor when voltage peaks and starts to drop a few hundreths of a volt, as it peaks the battery heats , thats when charging is 100%. The method is accurate but how accurate is any charger, there are defects made all the time.
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ransley wrote:

When my charger stays on much longer than usual and the cells are hot, I remove them, wait a minute, and reinsert them. Within a minute, the charger will shut off. To me, that's evidence that the cells were charged but the voltage drop was not detected.
I believe bubbles can form in nickel batteries during charging. I think they can sometimes keep the charger from seeing a voltage drop at the end of a charge. Touching to see if a cell is hot is how I detect a problem. In the future, I'll look for a charger that monitors temperature.
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