Newbie needs help unclogging dishwasher drain hose

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On Sunday, October 27, 2013 8:41:35 AM UTC-4, Steven L. wrote:

So you loosen the clamp, slide it out of the way and then the hose comes off by pulling and twisting it back and forth. Given that you said the hose is showing signs of deteriorating, I wouldn't waste time cleaning it, just replace it. The other end may be accessible by removing the cover panel at the bottom of the front of the dishwasher. Hopefully it doesn't require pulling the dishwasher out.
The hose should be routed so that between the disposal and the dishwasher it comes up high, to the bottom of the counter top. Either that or some will have an airgap in between. Either is there to help prevent waste water from getting into the dishwasher.
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On 10/27/2013 9:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I didn't say the hose is deteriorating, just clogged.
But it does dip down more than 6 inches between the disposal connector and the hole in the cabinet that it goes through to get to the dishwasher.
I don't see any way to correct that without pulling the dishwasher out of the wall.
Anyway, thanks for your advice. If all I have to do is pull and twist and jiggle the hose after the clamp is fully released, it should go smoothly.
--
Steven L.

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On Sunday, October 27, 2013 12:13:07 PM UTC-4, Steven L. wrote:

"The drain hose from my Kenmore dishwasher leading to my Kenmore garbage disposal is getting pretty clogged. Plus the material in the hose is starting to decompose."

Which is totally wrong. From what you're describing if the sink drain backs up, you have an easy path for dirty drain water to flow into the dishwasher. Preventing that is the purpose of a high loop or air gap.

That is probably true.

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On 10/27/2013 12:13 PM, Steven L. wrote:

yes.

again, yes

That's OK, but it should arc up to the underside of the countertop and back down to the hole in the cabinet. If it doesn't, see if there's enough slack in it to pull some more through the cabinet wall so that you can provide that high spot. If it doesn't want to stay in that position, fix it to the back wall of the cabinet with a conduit support or similar.

as trader4 said, you may be able to access the other end of the drain hose simply by removing the kick plate.

yup. and if you do have to replace the hose with a longer one, and/or splice it to lengthen it, your local big box or plumbing supply should be able to fix you up with what you need.
good luck
nate
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On 10/26/2013 7:53 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Your second image below - "wire-hose-clamp".

They are if it is a wire hose clamp.

OP says that is what is at the dishwasher.

I don't think the OP has looked at the clamp at the dishwasher. Could be either. This one is what is what is at my dishwasher, with a screw-type clamp at the sink. YMMV.
Wire hose clamps can be a PITA to get off and on.
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I agree that pliers are the correct tool for a wire hose clamp. However, the OP specific said "once I unscrew...that metal clamp". IMO the only reasonable assumption is that it is not a wire hose clamp.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Hi, Maybe worm gear clamp Then screw driver or nut driver will do. Any how I never experienced DW drain hose clogging. To me it is very unusual. Maybe because we don't indulge in too much meat, greasy food? Our 20 YO GE DW needed a new pump/motor assembly. Now I see main seal is going. As soon as it shows a sign of leak, time to replace it. Maybe another GE or Whirlpool.
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I suspect it's more an issue of the dishwasher drain hose being routed incorrectly and allowing debris from the sink to flow back into the drain line as well as debris from the dishwasher to pool at a low spot. Infrequent usage would allow the food particles to dry out and act like cement, trapping even more food debris.
--
Bobby G.



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<stuff snipped>

There should only be the single hose clamps. Can you get a camera in there so we can se for sure what we're dealing with?
The hose should be "pressed fit" on which means that it's not exactly loose enough to fall right off but it should come off with a small amount of twisting. The longer it's been on, the harder it usually is to remove the hose. Also, be careful with the amount of force you use because over time the plastic fitting (I assume) the hose attaches to may have become brittle. The trick to successful home repair is to keep from making things worse by trying to fix them. (-;

Compressed air (be sure to cover the drain with wet rags) sometimes works if you have an air compressor. A bottle brush or a dowel would pose less of a puncture threat than a coat hanger and provide a wide cross-section area to push out the clogs. I bought a very small snake (flexible coiled wire) from Harbor Freight that works very well with such hoses. I'll look up the part if you think you might try that method. It can maneuver around twists and turns in the hose and is probably a much better choice than a dowel or any of the other stuff.
I would only remove one end of the hose - the one with the screw-on clamp and then see if I could clear it without disturbing the other end, especially if it has a different kind of clamp. That may well be the case if the manufacturer installed the hose, and not a plumber. Manufacturers use clips that can be installed by speedily by machine and they are trickier to remove and replace successfully by humans. If there's no screw on the second clip, leave it alone until you have no choice but to remove it.

If it was snug enough that it didn't just fall off in your hands, you don't need to do anything special to put it back on other than making sure the hose clamp is snug. You may find it's so snug that you need to apply a little dishwashing detergent to the inside of the hose to help it slide onto the mating pipe nipple.
All that said, you can't go wrong listening to Mr. Drahn (really?) and trying the TSP route first.
Do you have a filter in your dishwasher that might be missing?
http://www.imperfecthomemaking.com/2012/02/how-to-clean-your-dishwasher-without.html
--
Bobby G.




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On 10/27/2013 12:54 AM, Robert Green wrote:

Here it is.
http://img546.imageshack.us/img546/8994/r610.jpg
I'm sorry it's blurred; my camera insisted on focusing on the background instead.

No, the problem is that its drain hose dips down way below the height of the disposal. As a result, whenever I pour water into my kitchen sink, it (and any debris in the sink) goes BACKWARDS into my dishwasher!
Many times, I have found waste water and debris in my dishwasher even though I didn't run it. It came from my kitchen sink.

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Steven L.

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wrote in message

there

That's good enough! Screw on hose clamp - should be easy enough to remove and replace.
<stuff snipped>

Well, that's not right. )-" I believe you need a one way valve called a check valve on the input to the disposal that only allows waste water to flow OUT of the dishwasher and not back into dishwasher discharge hose. That's not an area I am too familiar with so perhaps some of the plumbing experts here can advise you on how to best to prevent the backflow of gunk into the hose.
Can you adjust the hose or hang it from a pipe hanger so that it doesn't dip like that? You could make a J hook with a coat hanger (or buy one at HD for a buck) that would hold the hose high enough so that it wouldn't backflow as much. I'd still prefer a check valve.
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On 10/27/2013 7:54 AM, Steven L. wrote:

The route should be from the dishwasher to high, near the bottom of the countertop, to the disposal, without a dip between the high and the disposal. Running the hose high prevents crud from going to the dishwasher.
I would use a smooth hose, not corrugated.
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On 10/28/2013 11:26 AM, bud-- wrote:

yes, twist and pull once the clamp is loose, it is simply clamped over a round plastic hose connection (there will be a slight "bump" in the connection to help retain the hose; additionally the rubber will tend to adhere to the connection over time.)
If it's really on there but good, that rubber piece at the end of the drain hose is available separately but you'll need another clamp to secure that repair piece to the corrugated hose. If you have no choice but to destroy it, slit the rubber lengthwise with a utility knife or single edge razor blade and peel it off the connection with a flat blade screwdriver. Don't cut so deeply that you mark the connection, but it's probably not the end of the world if you inadvertantly do so. Then cut the drain hose at the closest corrugation to the rubber to leave it as long as possible for the repair piece.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/InSinkErator-Dishwasher-Connector-Kit-DWC-00/100162549?cm_mmc=shopping-_-googleads-_-pla-_-100162549&skwcid&kwd=&ci_sku0162549&ci_kw=&ci_gpa=pla&ci_src588969#.Um569UmzXWg
Might be easier to disconnect and remove the whole hose from underneath the dishwasher (you'll need a shop towel to catch the water that'll drain out) and clean it outdoors, or just replace it entirely. Make sure not to use the sink while you do so, or buy a cap for the connection on the disposal so water doesn't run out under the cabinet.
http://www.diychatroom.com/f47/how-plug-hole-garbage-disposal-after-removing-dishwasher-piping-94451/
<snip> >>

This is exactly why it should be run up high. You really need to rectify that unless you *like* eating off plates that have been in essence stored in a cabinet with rotting potato peels.

exactly.

Every purpose-made dishwasher drain hose I've ever seen has been semi-rigid corrugated plastic. However, I do like this idea. Wonder if something like automotive heater hose is the right size to clamp onto the connections. (much like I've used 4" ductwork rather than "dryer vent hose" for dryer vents for much the same reason.)
nate
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I've only had crud in the dishwasher hose once, and it was my fault.
The kitchen sink was clogged, and I plunged it. Plunging it forced dirty water through the hose. (At the time I was unaware of how the dishwasher drain hose was routed; our previous house didn't have a dishwasher.)
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