Newbie needs help unclogging dishwasher drain hose

Page 1 of 2  
The drain hose from my Kenmore dishwasher leading to my Kenmore garbage disposal is getting pretty clogged. Plus the material in the hose is starting to decompose. (The hose is translucent so I can see it in there). And there is an odor coming from it that is really bothering my allergies.
I would like to try to unclog it, but I've never done it before.
Once I unscrew and loosen that metal clamp that holds the drain hose onto the garbage disposal, how do I physically remove the drain hose from the disposal? Does it just pull right off, or do I have to twist it off? Or is there some other connector that I have to unscrew? (The only connector I can see with a flashlight is that metal clamp around the drain nose.)
I figured I could stick an unbent straightened coat hanger into the hose and just try to dislodge the clogs. Is there a better way?
And most importantly: Once I unclog the hose, how do I get the hose back onto the garbage disposal in such a way that it won't leak after I put the clamp back on?
--
Steven L.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steven L. wrote:

Maybe you should call a plumber or a friend who is handy kinda guy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/26/2013 12:10 PM, Steven L. wrote:

Use it instead of dish washing detergent and run the empty dishwasher a couple of times. The gunk should be all gone. Be sure water is hot!
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, October 26, 2013 4:39:08 PM UTC-7, Paul Drahn wrote:

That's interesting! Do you think a monthly dose of TSP will help keep pipe s clear? I just blew a bundle on kitchen and bathroom sink plumbers. They talked about "maintenance". Guess I was just stupid, thinking that if I d idn't put fat, etc. down the kitchen sink & rarely used disposal, everythin g would be fine. Hah!
Now I do want to do regular maintenance, so asking if you recommend monthly TSP. If not, other suggestion?
TIA
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/26/2013 7:39 PM, Paul Drahn wrote:

Really???
I would never have thought of that in a million years.
I'll give it a try.
--
Steven L.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2013 5:35 AM, Steven L. wrote:

using only TSP and all the crap and stink was gone.
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2013 8:35 AM, Steven L. wrote:

The chemical called tri sodium phosphate, the government took it out of laundry detergents, years ago. And out of dish detergent about a year ago.
It's still sold in a few paint sections of hardware stores. Used to wash walls before painting. Be sure to read the ingredients, some TSP is silicate, not phosphate.
It greatly helped the detergent action. But, someone decided it was harming the environment.
Recently taken out of dish washer detergents, it had been removed from laundry detergent, years ago. Now, we all walk around in dirty clothes. And eat off dirty dishes.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2013 10:19 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Yes, I knew that removing phosphates was making cleaning harder for us.
I should have realized that removing phosphates would make clogs in cleaning equipment more likely too.
--
Steven L.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

FWIW, "Someone" didn't arbitrarily decide to ban phosphates. There was an incredibly detailed scientific analysis performed on the effects of phosphates in wastewater. This is not a Federal ban, BTW. Just a handful of states made the decision to ban phosphate detergents after years of research. As a result the industry decided voluntarily to remove phosphates from many of their products.
I don't know who's walking around with dirty clothes or eating off dirty plates because of the removal of phosphates - certainly not me. If the choice is a dead lake or bay full of dead fish or putting up with water spotted dishes and perhaps grayer looking whites, I'll take the spots and the gray every time. Cleaning up phosphate pollution costs big bucks so it make sense not to let it get started if there are alternatives.
The issue is quite complex but I think most reasonable people can understand the science behind the ban (mostly enacted by states with significant large bodies of water susceptible to algae blooms caused by phosphoric contamination):
<<By the late 1960s, nearly 10,000 public lakes had been effected by excessive nutrient enrichment by human activities (ReVelle and ReVelle 1988). Lake Erie's deteriorating condition was of particular concern, and it had been said that it had aged 15,000 years in the last 50 (Congressional Report HR 91-1004 April 14, 1970). The approximately 20,000 lbs of phosphorus per day going into the lake resulted in about a 2,600 square-mile area of the lake with no oxygen within ten feet of the bottom (Beeton 1971). As of 1967, mats of attached algae covered Lake Erie's shoreline, and desirable fish such as whitefish, blue pike and walleye had either severely declined or disappeared altogether (Congressional Report HR 91-1004 April 14, 1970). The general feeling around the late 1960s was that the nation's lakes and streams were getting more polluted each day, and phosphate detergents were the primary reason. Half the phosphorus input to Lakes Erie and Ontario came from municipal and industrial sources, of which 50% to 70% came from detergents. Over half of the phosphorus input to the Potomac estuary also came from detergents in municipal and industrial effluents (Congressional Report HR 91-1004 April 14, 1970). It was generally agreed that detergents accounted for about 50% of the wastewater phosphorus nationwide (Hammond 1971). There was a growing public consensus that in order to save lakes (like Lake Erie), phosphates must be banned from detergents.
The scientific community made the first real effort to understand the eutrophication process and problem. In April 1965 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and National Research Council (NRC) appointed a Planning Committee on Eutrophication in recognition of growing public concern over eutrophication of lakes, streams and estuaries. This committee recommended an international symposium, which was held at the University of Wisconsin on June 11-15, 1967 and attended by almost 600 persons representing the U.S. and 11 foreign countries. In addition to the NAS and NRC, the symposium was sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission, the U.S. Dept. of Interior, the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research and the U.S. Dept. of the Navy. Proceedings were published in Eutrophication: Causes, Consequences, Correctives in 1969 by the NAS.>>
So that "someone" turned out to be closer to 600 "someones" all with scientific backgrounds who decided that phosphates were causing real harm to the environment.
http://www.colorado.edu/conflict/full_text_search/AllCRCDocs/94-54.htm
People tend to forget what some of our lakes and waterways used to look like. Having lived near Lake Erie and the Chesapeake Bay I can say that things have improved drastically as a result of the attention paid to pollutants like phosphates. You can now swim in Lake Erie without encountering huge mats of phosphate enhanced green slime.
--
Bobby G.



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Green wrote:

Same here. I liver on the bank of Bow river, one of famous trout fishing water. Banning that chemical made a difference for sure. Once I watched president George Bush floating by with a fishing guide casting a line.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

It's another case that if you see the damage caused with your own eyes, you have a very different opinion of the issue. People living in areas without large bodies of water have probably never seen a foamed-up shoreline or huge mats of algae floating in the water.
Phospates have a negative effect on tourism, cost a lot of money for states like Maryland and New York to clean up and were being dumped into bays, lakes and rivers in enormous quantities. It's easy to think "What could my little dishwasher hurt?" but you have to remember to multiply that by the thousands of people running a dishwasher or washing machine every day.
As for your observations about the Bow River, they are quite correct:
<<The significant improvements observed in the lower Bow, particularly in the last decade, are directly related to improvements to Banff.s sewage treatment facility. The extreme coliform concentrations observed in the early years of the study period (1970s-1980s) have virtually disappeared. Increasing phosphorus trends, which began before 1989, have significantly dropped off and average concentrations have been reduced.>>
Source: http://www.pc.gc.ca/docs/v-g/ie-ei/at-ag/sec5/page4.aspx
--
Bobby G.



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2013 09:41 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I saw a turd floating by on our local river too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Malformed floats? I thought he'd be a sinker, for sure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 27 Oct 2013 08:35:11 -0400, "Steven L."

Your government at work. New formula of the dish detergent no longer contains phosphate so the lack of it may be adding to your problems. Be sure you get real TSP and not some substitute with the same name.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/26/2013 3:10 PM, Steven L. wrote:

Loosen the clamps and twist it off. If it is nasty inside, spend $12 for a new on. Push the ends on, twist if you have to, tighten clamps.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 26 Oct 2013 15:10:41 -0400, "Steven L."

There is a good chance that if you go to sears.com and then navigate to their service,support, parts area you can look up your model dishwasher. Once you find it there is almost always an exploded view of it showing all the parts. You might be able to tell on that picture how the drain hose connects. I'm guessing it uses a simply wire clamp to keep it tight. I don't think you can just "pull it off" without using pliers to loosen the clamp and move it down off the nipple first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not a wire clamp, it's a hose clamp.

Pliers are probably not the right tool to loosen the OP's hose clamp since he said "once I unscrew...that metal clamp".
Typically a screw driver or nut driver/socket is used for the type of hose clamp I suspect he has.
Steven,
Does it look like this?
http://www.irrigationsupplydepot.com/images/products/detail/HoseClamp.jpg
or this...
http://img.directindustry.com/images_di/photo-g/wire-hose-clamp-11813-2728969.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 27 Oct 2013 01:53:48 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

The ones I've seen are made of wire - think of the old heater hose clamps on cars, thick spring wire. I was differentiating between the screw on type he indicated he saw on the disposal end with what I think he'd see on the water pump end.

Pliers are the correct tool to use on what I referred to as "wire clamps". But no, for the other clamp, on the disposal end, which he obviously has seen, it would take a screwdriver or nutdrivdrer.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Google "wire clamp". Just because it's made of wire doesn't make it a "wire clamp", especially since there really is something specifically known as a "wire clamp". Whether it's the screw on type or this type, it's still a hose clamp.
http://commonwealthinc.ca.c9.previewyoursite.com/ESW/Images/58_inch_single_wire_hose_clamp.jpg
Keep in mind that the OP admitted to being a newbie, so we should make sure we keep the terms we use accurate.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/26/2013 9:53 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Of course, I was going to loosen the clamp, slide it down the hose, before trying to disconnect the hose. I was just wondering if then the hose would just twist off the disposal or if there was some other "gotcha" I didn't know about.

YES. ** THIS. **

NO. ** NOT THIS. **
--
Steven L.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.