New window in shower - use Corian?

I'm planning on doing a complete renovation of my straight-from-the-1960's bathroom. One of the issues that I want to fix is the old wooden window in the shower. Right now there's a plastic curtain in front of the window that's there to prevent the wood from getting wet and rotting.
I'd like to replace the old wood window with a vinyl window and finally getting rid of the plastic curtain, as showering in between two plastic curtains (the window curtain and the shower curtain) isn't my preference.
1st question is whether it is an issue if the inside of a vinyl window gets wet? Obviously windows are designed so that they can get rained on from the outside. What about the inside of the window? Will this be an issue, and/or do they design certain types windows specifically for such settings? I'm trying to figure out whether an awning or hopper window would be best for not collecting water on the inside (i.e. I imagine a horizontal sliding window would collect water in the "groves" at the bottom)
The entire bathwall would be tiled and I'd make sure that the window sill would be sloped downwards towards the bath tub so that any water can drip away. Concerning that material, I've read about one company that uses Corian instead of wood for such a purpose. To me it does seem to make sense instead of having a wood window sill/trim that can rot over time. Does using Corian sound like a good idea or something crazy?
I know that the simple solution would probably be simply to remove the window completely and use glass blocks instead, but I'd prefer having a functional window even if it means paying more. As long as it doesn't cost WAY more.
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jonny snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

The glass block installs I've seen have had either a small vent sized vinyl window in them, or a larger (2x2 blocks) size. You start loosing the privacy feature, with a large plain glass window.
If the rest of the tub surround is tile, glass block that gets grouted in is the way to go. IMHO. A window that took up a 4x4 glass blocks, with frosted glass would do nicely.
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In my last home I had the same situation, and installed an ordinary vinyl, double hung window. It did not create any problems. I forget exactly how I did the sill as it has been awhile. But you can get solid vinyl moldings in a variety of styles at any home center, see what works for you.
Don't limit yourself to the standard casing and sill, look into a picture frame style, etc. I have windows done picture frame style and think they look very nice. I also have some done with a variation, using corner blocks instead of just mitering the frame together.
You will probably need extension jams as most vinyl windows are not very thick. They can be bent from vinyl or aluminum coil stock so you have no wood at all. A siding company will bend them for you if you do not have access to stock and a brake.
But you can also get plain vinyl trim pieces to make the jams, just like the trim.
Dennis
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jonny snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If that window has glass less than 5' above the tub floor, it's required by code to have tempered or safety glass.
Corian is fine for the sill, as is Azek (PVC wood-substitute). The Azek takes paint well and won't rot.
Whether a vinyl window would work in the wet location would depend on the type of window and manufacturer. You may need to caulk some holes and/or seams, but the water won't affect the window itself.
R
R
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in our second floor bathroom we used a vinyl custom made tilt in window that sends any rainy day water back outdoors on the outside sill. but we screwed up the inside sill with insufficient pitch to allow for it to settle into place and wound up adding some vinyl trim on silicone seal to pitch the shower water from the sill inward to the tub side of the tub surround. also you really want to look at some more expensive silent heat light exhaust fans with the infrared bulbs they are ideal for after your hot shower on a chilly day. the clear not red lamps add extra light for shaving or reading. try this ebay search for sone ratings below one (!) at: http://search-desc.ebay.com/search/search.dll?sofocus=bs&sbrftog=1&from=R10&satitle=silent+bathroom+exhaust+fan&sacat=-1%26catref%3DC6&bs=Search&fts=2&sargn=-1%26saslc%3D2&sacqyop=ge&sacqy=&ftrt=1&ftrv=1&sabdlo=&sabdhi=&saprclo=&saprchi=&sass=&fsop=3&fsoo=1
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