New Water Heater equals Air in Lines?

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to get the last little bit out.
I'd buy that for a few days to a week. But he said it's been going on for a long time, got the impression it's been months, though I don't recall if he's actually given a number. And in every case I've been involved with it was over in a matter of minutes once that line was flowing. It's not unusual to open a faucet a week later, that hasn't been used and have air come out of it, but that isn't what he's saying. He says he has spurting, gurgling going on continously, on all hot faucets. And also that the spurting starts when the hot water arrives at the faucets. That strongly suggests that it's not coming from some random place, but actually from the tank.

Why would that be? A simple battery in a lab experiment can fill a test tube up with gas in a matter of minutes.
 I can see two obvious ways to test for it.

doesn't have to hold pressure.  Open the bag under water so it fills.   Run a hose from the hot water faucet into the bag.  The air/gas/whatever will collect. Poke a small hole in the top of the bag, squeeze a little gas out and use a lighter to check.

 The case exterior is grounded.  So electrolysis would require jolts to leak from the element through the tank coating to the metal body and back to the panel through the ground.  The voltage would be 120 of course, not 240.  Put a clamp on ammeter on the bare ground wire.  You shouldn't m easure any current.  Disconnect the ground wire, and if it is electrolysi s it should stop.  You might be able to measure voltage between ground wi re connection and ground wire with them disconnected.  (I always get in t rouble here with voltmeter measurements.)

The current path doesn't have to be from the heating element to the tank wall. The outside of the element is grounded. If it has a hole in it, the path could be from the hot electrode inside to the metal outside of the heating element. A very short path. Also, it would not require a coated tank. The elements screw in and the metal plug part of the element is uncoated.
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 I've never seen it happen myself.  My inlaw's water has that smell, bu t it's from a well, and in both the hot and cold water.  The hot water is worse of course because it volatilizes.  But while I haven't seen it, th ere are lots of articles that say it happens.

ery easily.  If it were concentrated enough to burp at a faucet, it proba bly would be enough to kill you.  For sure it would corrode anything near by, probably eat through pipes.

racked down the original report and it turned out to be something else, lon g story.

e like jello inside, with that much bacteria.

 BUT, you never notice it in cold water for two reasons.  Cold water di ssolves more air, and your cold water pipe layout has some areas where it g ets trapped.  Your hot water tank has a dip tube for cold water entry, bu t hot water leaves through the top.  Your water sits in the tank long eno ugh for air to separate and form a layer on top of the water.
If he has a submersible, there is no air available to inject. HOWEVER you do hve a good point. Some wills produce water that has air dissolved in it. It could be coming out of solution and collecteding as you suggested.
I occasionaly get a short 'burp' from my system. Never paid attention if it is only from the hot side.
<snip> Harry K
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I'm not sold on any analysis yet. It's just been my experience that until you find the real "root cause," you're spinning wheels spending money.
It might be useful to know the water analysis. I assume you wouldn't drink well water without an occasional test, so you should know pH, TDS, hardnes s, conductivity, etc.
Even though these symptoms appeared when the water heater was changed, it's not a given that this was the cause. Maybe the characteristics of the wel l had changed, and it would have happened with either heater. That's the k ind of coincidence that drives you nuts troubleshooting.
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dness, conductivity, etc.

well had changed, and it would have happened with either heater.  That's the kind of coincidence that drives you nuts troubleshooting.
There is another puzzling aspect to this:
"any time you run a faucet it is fine until the hot water makes it to the tap and then it gurgles and spits every few minutes. "
It sounds like this then goes on continously? If some gas of some kind is getting generated in the WH, by whatever reaction you would think it would show up as the first hot water arrives. But you'd also think that it would not last too long. I mean how much gas could there be? You would think in a few minutes it would be over. And then if you drew hot water again in like 5 or 10 mins you would have no air, or at least no noticeable air. And if you let it recover for say 8 hours, then you'd have more air again.
Another interesting experiment would be to turn off the WH, use up all the hot water and see how it behaves with just cold water in it. Is it possible this "gurgling/spitting" isn't even due to air/gas? Another key experiment would be to get the water going into a container, preferabley via a hose, maybe on the washing machine tap, to verify that bubbles are in fact responsible. I mean you would certainly think it's air/gas related, but who knows. Is it possible something is partially blocking the flow, causing the fits and spurts?
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wrote:

I'm wondering about the sulfur as well, but don't know anything about the makeup of the tank.
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rdoc wrote the following on 3/5/2013 9:19 PM (ET):

http://www.justanswer.com/plumbing/1nhpk-water-heater-putting-air-hot-water-system-when.html or: http://preview.tinyurl.com/c54adyq
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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That whole thing is based on the premise that there is air trapped in the pipes somewhere. That seems unlikely to me, since he says it's been going on for months. At some point, if air is coming out, it would exhaust itself and several months seems like a very long time. Also, since it's coming out of ALL the hot water taps, it would have to be trapped in a common part of the pipes, close to the WH. That it's coming from either the tank or the pipes close to the tank are further verified by the fact that he says the air only shows up when hot water arrives at the faucet. All that suggests to me that it is in fact being generated inside the tank.
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wrote:

Yep. Can't be anywhere else and the possibility of air being 'sucked into a joint' is zero.
Harry K
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