New Toilet Drain Pipe

How do I put a slope (grade) in a new toilet drain to run it towards the septic tank. I picture a 90 degree elbow keeping the drain pipe pretty parallel to the ground. Is there another type of pipe fitting that is made for this ??
Thanks, Ray
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Ray wrote:

Drainage elbows and other fittings aren't *actually* 90 degrees, etc. The slope is molded right into the fitting. Stick 2 lengths of pipe in an EL and hold your square up to the resulting assy.
Jim
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Speedy Jim, Thanks for your input but got another question for you if you could help. I was at the hardware store checking out fittings to embark on the toilet flange roughing in before pouring my concrete. I envisioned leaving some standpipe sticking out of the concrete and once the concrete cured cutting the pipe flush to the floor to accept the toilet flange. The toilet flanges that I came across only mount to the outside of the pipe and that wouldn't work if the pipe is cut flush. I quess the only other option would be to have the flange already in place prior to the pouring of the cement. Is this a correct assumption ?? What happens if the flange screws up down the road and the joint is below the concrete surface ?? I was hoping that I would find a flange fitting that would mount to the inside of the toilet standpipe. Is there such a thing ?? Thanks, Ray
> Ray wrote: > > > > How do I put a slope (grade) in a new toilet drain to run it towards the > > septic tank. I picture a 90 degree elbow keeping the drain pipe pretty > > parallel to the ground. Is there another type of pipe fitting that is made > > for this ?? > > > > Thanks, > > Ray > > Drainage elbows and other fittings aren't *actually* 90 degrees, etc. > The slope is molded right into the fitting. Stick 2 lengths of pipe > in an EL and hold your square up to the resulting assy. > > Jim
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Ray wrote:

Depends. If you're using 4" pipe, there is such a flange. If 3" pipe, there is still one but it offers reduced diam of the opening. Parts here: http://www.plumbingsupply.com/toiletflanges.html
There are also rubber expansion sleeve flanges.
There are cutters for removal: http://www.plumbingproducts.com/pvcsaver.html
Jim
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Ray wrote:

top of the flange on the same leve as the concrete.. i have a modern house with concrete slab and ceramic tile on the bathroom floor. when i changed out the toilet the flange was the same level as the ceramic tile floor.... i got iron pipe down there... if you have the same you should just cut up the cement about the level of the bottom of the flange and then patch it up with some concrete after you set the flange into place.. have the top of the flange level with the fininished floor.... then the toilet will not wobble as it might if you have the flange too high and then you gonna need some shims to stop the toilet from moving around, shifting.....
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