new roofing questions

I am roofing a new 1-car garage and I have a couple questions I can't seem to find answers on. I have no qualms about doing the roofing, but like everything, I think I'm overthinking things, but need to get some feedback for a sanity check.
I live in Oregon, so we get a fair amount of rain - so much, that in matching up shingle colors to my existing house, it was hard to say that the 3-year old roof wasn't partially green.
Anyway, the questions are:
1. Drip edge - leave away from the eave, like 1/4 or 1/2 inch, even if putting gutters under? Also, how much should they overlap on the eaves - I've seen 3 inches and 6 inches? Do I need to use roof cement to adhere the felt to the drip edges? 2. Vents - the holes are cut for the vents, but I assume I won't put them on until I after I shingle (which means cutting the shingles out of the hole). 3. Ridge shingles - is just cutting separate tabs from 3-tabs an acceptable ridge? 4. Nailing or stapling roofing felt - it seems like stapling would be enough.
thanks,
danbo
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Drip edge should be gently laid on the eave so the part that hangs down just touches the fascia, and isn't distorted when fastened. You'll still be able to slip in the gutter later. They only need to be overlapped 1/8th to a quarter inch. No need to adhere felt to the drip edge. Cut out your shingles when you install the vents, so the vents will be flashed properly and look good. Just mind where you step in the meantime! Cutting 3-tabs for ridge has always worked for me, just have to make 4 cuts per shingle, so you don't get excess material hanging lower than the bottom edge of the caps. If you're going to walk on the felt, than nail it properly, as staples don't have near the holding power that roofing nails will give you. Tom
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step in the meantime! Maybe a quick shot of day-glo orange on the shingles where the cut-outs for the vents are, just to remind you?
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I've watched many a professional, and even done it a few times myself over the years. Looks like they always jam it right up against the edge.

You treat it as a shingle. Install the flange on top of any shingles below it, and install any shingles above it over the top of the flange.

That's what we've always done. That's what every professional I've ever dealt with has done. I think it's common practice.
You actually just cut the whole shingle in 1/3s, not just the tabs.

Stapling is faster. Either is adequate, because you're putting the shingles on over it, and you're going to nail the s#it out of the shingles, right through the felt. Use nails with plastic washers if you use nails on the felt.
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Thanks for the replies - once I got going, it all started coming together. The hardest part was doing the eaves without scaffolding - moving the ladder every minute is a royal pain - so I went out and rented some scaffolding!! All the things I've learned - now maybe I'll use my knowledge again someday. Number one lesson - I think next time I'll use 30# felt to reduce the paper's desire to get wavy after installation.
Tom, I think if I would have read your second reply before I papered, I might have avoided putting my foot through one of the vent holes - fortunately I felt it start to give before sinking my leg all the way through it - that could have been ugly...
- danbo
On May 25, 11:19 am, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

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Glad you're okay. Tom
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