New Refrigerator Water Hook Up

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I will soon have a new refrigerator delivered. It will replace a unit that does NOT now have a water feed. I do not want to pay the quopted $150, for that water feed to be installed by a plumber.
Does anyone have a recommendation, as to best way to connect to an existing water line. I once used a clamp type device, installed over a copper water line. The clamp had a screw feed that would penetrate the copper tube and then provide the water to a pipe leading to the fridge. Is that still the best way?
Should I then use a new copper pipe, to connect to the fridge's water input. Is there a better (easier) way - ala PEX tubing or other "new" material? I will be connecting to that copper water pipe in my basement, which is maybe 25 feet from the refrigerator.
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On 4/25/2016 10:48 AM, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Where is the line -- in a wall that can be exposed? (basements often have the pipe out there for all to see; no issues!)
IME, the vampire taps are a cheap hack. Do it right.

Consider also installing a carbon filter -- instead of relying on the overpriced CUSTOM filter that will be present inside the refrigerator (if it has thru-the-door dispensers).
If you're accessing the water line in the basement, you can install an OVERSIZED filter, there -- and not have it as an eyesore in the kitchen. Be sure to install a stop upstream from it (to facilitate changing).
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 1:48:16 PM UTC-4, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If...
...you have open access to a 1/2" water pipe ...you can move the pipe enough to get the fitting installed ...you aren't comfortable sweating in a copper fitting (or just don't want to) ...you don't mind spending a little extra for quick, no brainer install
http://www.sharkbite.com/product/tee-stop/
or
http://www.sharkbite.com/product/straight-stops/
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2016 11:21:02 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Thanks to all of the QUICK repsonses. I do have easy, open access to the existing water pipe, in my basement. It will be easy to drill a hole in the floor, behind the fridge, to connect to that pipe.
I have use SharkBite connecors in the past, for other copper connections. The referenced link looks to be an ideal soltion, with a local shut off
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On 2016-04-25 1:48 PM, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Vampire taps are a hack, it will fail, eventually.
--
Froz....

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On 4/25/2016 1:48 PM, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Not the "best" way but the easiest for DIY. Sweating in a valve would be better. That said, my saddle valve has been in use for about 25 years with no problem.
You can buy a stainless steel braided line to run to the fridge from the valve. They come in various lengths and have the proper fittings in place.
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 2:29:19 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

+1
I have the piercing saddle type valve on my humidifier and fridge. Twenty plus years, no leaks. It's quick, easy and works for me. Fridge uses a plastic line, I'd probably go with braided for a new install. I don't think copper has a compelling advantage, especially since the fridge usually has to be moved with the line in place. They probably have a packaged kit at HD, etc that includes the line and valve.
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:48:06 -0400, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

IMHO that is not, nor ever has been the best way. Quite the opposite. If you're not comfortable working with copper I recommend you pay for a professional to do the job right. You will be money ahead in the long run.

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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 2:38:46 PM UTC-4, Gordon Shumway wrote:

Please define "working with copper".
Sweated fittings, compression fittings and Sharkbite fittings could all be considered "working with copper".
The order of ease is the reverse of the cost, but any of those would be considerably less expensive than a professional.

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You just answered your own question.

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On Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:48:06 -0400, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I'd use copper tubing, NOT that cheap plastic tubing, (sold for that purpose), which can break over time. Those screw on valves that puncture the pipe are ok. (On copper pipe). Shut off the water when you install it, unless you want your face washed.
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 3:53:37 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Why would you need to shut off the water? The clamp seals the pipe before you even puncture it with the needle.
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 4:01:45 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

+1
At least it does if you do it right. :)
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On 4/25/2016 6:20 PM, trader_4 wrote:

To be consistent with your other winger dinger argument, you'd have to flood the OP house, and kill all his family with black mold. Isn't that what winger dingers do, if they can't call a plumber?
As for me, I like the copper tubing. Drill small pilot hole for the piercing valve. And lower tax rates for all tax payers, including the rich.
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On 4/25/2016 4:01 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Years ago, a more experienced tech taught me to shut off the water, release the pressure at a faucet. Drill a small hole, instead of using the self piercing function.
--
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Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
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On 4/25/16 1:48 PM, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Strongly recommend against clip on/pierce-pipe device. If it doesn't leak when you install it, just be patient.
As Rick said to Ilsa, maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow...but soon and for the rest of your life...
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Despite all the warnings here, I use the clamp-on method. It should come with the frig. I did my own that way some 15 years ago and it's never leaked. Nor have I noticed one leaking on jobs. Easy doesn't necessarily mean chintzy. What I *don't* trust is pex. I expect that stuff will be recalled in a decade or two and people will marvel at the obvious stupidity of plastic water pipes, along with arsenic-treated wood for playgrounds and "eco" bulbs with mercury in them. But....to each their own, I guess. :)
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:48:06 -0400, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

I used one of those about 25 years ago. Still using it and no problems. BTW, my water chemistry is neutral. That could be a factor to consider.
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:48:06 -0400, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

The right answer probably depends on how the cold water under the sink is hooked up and whether you can get to the fridge from there easily. On newer houses that is going to be a compression connector that is easy to take apart, put a "T" in and move on. I also agree, using the made up, braided hose to the fridge is the way to go.
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i DON T LIKE that 1/4 inch supply line. its easy to bend and can restrict water flow. fridgesmust be moved from time to time
scrub floor, wash walls, fridge ha problem etc etc etc.
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