New House with No Main Water Shutoff Valve

Page 1 of 2  
Some friends have recently acquired a new house in a modular community. I was surprised to find that the only way to shut off the water supply to the house is from the street! All the houses on the street are set up the same way! My question is this: Is this common practice? And, if so, is the only reason it is done is to save 10 bucks on a valve? Help much appreciated. Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The only place I have ever had a second shut-off valve at the house was when we had a basement. None of the other houses had one, including the one we are living in now.
On Sun, 15 May 2005 02:36:19 GMT, frank1492

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
just wondering....does 'modular community' = trailer park??? "Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It may be like in Eastern NC, where some new communities are set up and zoned strictly for modular construction housing, to keep the community consistent. I know of one where the houses are 2 story, 170,000 range, half acre lots, and that isn't a cheap home around here. A stock 3 bedroom brick ranch around here can be had for, say, 75 to 150 K, depending on location, of course. I just bought another brick ranch in rural farm country, and it has water cutoff at the meter enclosure at the street only.
RJ
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Didn't think my house had a water shut off valve either, but it does.
Mine is located in front of my house, in a well about a foot down in the ground. It was a devil to find because it was grown over with flowers and plants.
A local plumber told me all the shut off valves here are below ground because of the freezing weather.
Could yours be underground also?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 May 2005 02:36:19 GMT, frank1492

if a home owner got a chance to sit down with the builder and the plumber before they built his house they would definitely agree that a cut off valve needs to be installed in the line just inside the house where the water line comes in...if you buy your house from a huge house construction corporation...taking bids from plumbers to work for them they cut out the little "frills" like cut off valves inside the house...you can go to the street and open the meter box and turn the valve off...in zero degree weather or pouring down rain...
It's very bad to remain an ignorant person while dealing with contractors...
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 May 2005 02:36:19 GMT, frank1492

None of the 5000 homes in my division have shutfoff valves except at the street water meter. 1980 to 2005.
Many of the communities require calling the city utility company to shut off the water. Then they started charging a fee, so lots of people like yourself installed their own shutoff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just cannot imagine NOT having one when an emergency problem arises. The cost of installing one when the house was build would probably have been $20 or so. That puts $100,000 in the hands of the builder. You can be sure I'd put one in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't see it as any big deal. I bought a long sprinkler shut-off tool from Home Depot. If I need to turn off the water, I just pop off the meter box cover near the street and turn the water off. Would take me just as long if the shut-off were next to the house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message

It is not a big deal if everything works OK. When you have to do a repair at night, in the cold, in the rain or when something lets lose, finding that shut-off tool can take an agonizingly long time. I want to be able to do it quickly, from inside the house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Not if the shut off valve is located at the far end of the crawl space and access is through a hatch in the floor of a closet with about a zillion things piled on it, like at my house. I've never turned the inside house valve off, always used the valve at the street. Besides it only requires a Crescent wrench. Now if I needed a special wrench, I would paint the handle RED and would hang it by the garage door and always replace it whenever I used it. Course that would keep some idiot child or spouse from moving it, but if I had an idiot child or idiot spouse (or an idiot me) I would buy a second wrench and hide it in a special place that I would not likely forget.
What I can't imagine is having a flood from a broken pipe or valve and waiting for the water company to come turn the water off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why was I of the impression that homeowners were not supposed to tamper with the town's valves? (The house is in CT.) We do know where the valve is, and it is accessible. Are keys readily available to deal with these?
On Sun, 15 May 2005 06:49:44 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ask for a water shut off key at ACE, Home Depot, Lowe's, a local plumbing shop, etc.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 May 2005 15:59:11 GMT, frank1492

yes keys are available to deal with water main cut off valves...go to the Home Depot hand tool department and ask for a "Crescent Wrench" or any other brand of "Adjustable Wrench"...stick it down in your water meter box and turn the water off.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not that simple. Where do you live? The poster is in CT. Our water mains are 48" or deeper. That takes a mighty long arm to reach down that far with an adjustable. I'd not be surprised to find them even deeper as you go farther north.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 May 2005 06:49:44 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

Try doing it quickly when a pipe breaks in your house and it's below zero outside with 3 feet of snow over the meter box. I'd shut the thing off NOW and spend the $10 for a valve and install it whereever the water enters the house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 May 2005 13:57:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Actually, I can turn off everything except the outside faucets which are freeze-proof. The water from the meter goes first to our water softener which feeds all house faucets. I can turn it off there. Not perfect, but better than nothing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message wrote in message

Call your local water company and find out who would be required to pay the cost of repairs if the valve at the street broke while you were turning it off or on.
The local plumbers will not even touch that valve unless it's an absolute emergency and I agree in writing to pay the cost, instead of them, if something happens with that valve when they're working with it. They makes an appointment with the city water department to turn the water off and on. The city water department also recommends this procedure on each month's water bill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There is one valve before the water meter. That's the city's responsibility. There is another valve after the water meter along with a pressure regulator. That's my responsibility. I own everything after the meter. Everything is in the same underground vault.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message

Don't be too sure. Had the city shut off the main in the street so that my house shut off valve could be replaced. Guess what? The street-to-valve extension shaft snapped in two. City gets Back hoe--dig up street--replace extension shaft--fill hole--hot top over dug up street.------- Now, you don't want to get involved in all of that do you? MLD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.