New Garage Foundation

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Can anyone tell me why the footing has to be poured across the garage door? This mean I need to pump the concrete instead of driving the truck inside. I am thinking of failing my inspection so I can drive the truck inside and save the $500 pumping cost.
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If you fail inspection, how long do you have to correct the problem?
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wrote:

I am the home owner and builder. I won't correct. I will just build the building the way I want and ignore the inspector. I don't need a certificate of occupancy. I have my permit. The building meets all zoning and setback requirements. It is not going to collapse. I will just build it and not call for any inspections.
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Pat wrote:

Fine and dandy, until you or your heirs go to sell the place. Or it gets hit by a storm, or a fire, and the insurance company just laughs at you.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

I sold my last house. The buyer wanted to know about permits for a floor. We had built a floor that divided the cathedral ceiling at the second level floor 20 X 12 floor. Gave us another room upstairs.
Luckily, I had papers from the "friend" and a statement of work and a materials list. Not pulling and complying with a permit, can be difficult when selling a house.
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I own it. No need for insurance. If it matters after I am dead I don't think it will be my problem.
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Pat wrote:

Hi, Sounds like you're no good builder(?)
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Oren wrote:

???? Just how long and wide is your garage? Are you talking just the footers, or the stem walls as well? Unless your lot has some real weirdness to it, I've never seen a location where they couldn't get 'close enough' with the chutes, to hit all the forms to where 2 strong guys with shovels couldn't coax the concrete along. Or have they ditched the extended chutes in favor of the fancy pumper truck, the better to make money with?
Yes, you need the footing across the garage door. It catches the weight and the impact load from the cars driving up onto the slab, and it helps prevent frost heave from when water gets under the slab (at the crack where it meets the apron or driveway) and freezes. You can tell cheap tract houses where they didn't have footings under the door, by the big gaps at the bottom of the garage doors. If your town requires a continuous footing, good on them.
As to how to solve your problem- how much more would the redi-mix company charge to do the pour in 2 deliveries a day apart? One pour is best, but you can lace them together with rebar stuck in the first pour, unless the inspector freaks out.
Or there is always the old standby of ten strong guys and a wheelbarrow conga line, if the truck will hang around that long.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

I got one old guy and a woman. If it is needed I'll put it in. If I take out two trees and a grape arbor I can get down one side. The other side I may have to move a 8X25 building to the side 10 feet or so to get access. The garage is 28X32. A contractor looked at it today and told me it would have to be pumped. I told him I didn't want to pay.
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You're saving 55c per square foot by nixng the pump?
Who did the design? Could a you substitute a "thickened edge" on the slab for the footer? Could the footer at the opening be poured along with the garage slab?
Is the footer as you call it really a grade beam and part of the lateral system?
How big is your pour? $500 for a pump seems a bit high....
cheers Bob
Does the garage have a second story?
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Could the footer at the opening be poured along with the garage slab?
I like this idea.
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Pat wrote:

If he can't get the concrete truck to the back third of the foundation trench, how is he going to get the slab poured? Same access problems. Worse, actually, since you usually pour the slab last, in case anything moves during the framing and roofing phase.
But yeah, if he puts rebar hooks on either end of the gap, he could do a monolithic pour of the front slab footer.
-- aem sends...
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It is a part of the integrity of the structure.
I read your other post and you may find it to be much cheaper in the long run to pay the $500 up front and do the job right. Town inspectors have ways of making your life miserable and the legal fees can be many times the 500 bucks. Do the job right.
You may appreciate that footing when the lack of it causes heaving or settling in the years ahead. Much depends on the soil and climate conditions, but codes are generally brought about for good reason.
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The county has my money. I think they would be happy to never come out.
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It supports the concrete garage floor which extends OUT to the outer edge of the foundation between the foundation "walls" either side of the door(s)
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It is not unusual to pour the close footing first, lay down plenty of ply or planking and drive the truck over the filled up footing.
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DanG wrote:

I did mine opposite. I threw a bunch of firewood logs in the ditch for the truck to drive over then pulled them out and quick finished the rebar after the truck was out and ready to pour the footer at the doors. Although I didn't see the OP so I don't know how deep your footer is.
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I think the OP is from Oregon... So I'm assuming frost depth isnt that much.
I'd be surprised if the footer is any deeper than 18 or 24".
wrt to another post... "how's he going to pour the slab if he cannot reach?"
A couple extra chute segments will get him more than close enough to place the slab mud, but not close enough to get it into the back footing forms.
Pat, my suggestion is squeeze the pump price & then bit the bullet......I think you'll be much happier with the process & the result.
cheers Bob
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fftt wrote:

Come to think of it, don't people use wheelbarrows anymore? I helped with a couple pours that way. It ain't fun but it doesn't take that long with 2 or 3 guys each with a wheel barrow.
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Doh! Excellent point!
I totally forgot a very tiring experience I had nearly 40 years ago......
A buddy & I were hired to unload a concrete truck......the whole 9 yards (I think) , two guys, two wheelbarrows
We wheeled the mud ~100ft for a garage .....only about 45 trips each, done in just over an hour
We ran our asses off ....
As Tony suggested, wheelbarrows are doable & probably cheaper way cheaper than the put.
cheers Bob
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