New Drywall Question

I'm closing in a hole about 5' x 5'. Based upon the width of the wall and true width of a 2' x 4' that will be used to frame the hole, I'm left with 3/4" on each side. If I use 5/8" drywall, I will be 1/8" shy of a level surface. Should I use this method and then fill in the 1/8" with compound to bring it up or should I rip 1/2" off the framing material so I can get 1" on each side and double up 1/2" drywall on each side to get the drywall flush with the existing wall? If the latter is the best method, should the pieces be glued in some way before they are placed up or should the normal act of screwing them to the joists be enough?
Thanks, C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C wrote:

Use 2x4s to frame the opening, then shim out the studs with any thin stock you have available so that 1/2" or 5/8" drywall will be flush with the exiting wall. Just about any thin stock will work -- paneling, luan, plywood, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Hmm... An excellent idea.
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C wrote:

I always have the same problem when matching drywall to old plaster and lathe. Recently, I was doing a job and went to the Borg for drywall. In that section of the store, I found a package of cardboard material sold specifically for that purpose. The same width as a 2 x 4, you stack as many as you need to shim up your panel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's interesting. I'll have to visit today. This is why I ask questions to this group. I know that I make things much more complicated for myself at times and there is usually a simpler method. I know I'm not the only one who has faced these minor challenges in the past.
Thanks for the tip!
Here's another quick one: After the drywall is up, should I apply a skim coat of compound to the whole surface or is it acceptable to just prime the paper and then texture/paint on top of that? I've never seen anywhere where it says to skim the entire surface, but I thought this might be better than leaving it as bare paper.
C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and
with
compound
get
drywall
the
normal
questions
the
Some painters will tell you that you must primer the drywall before you texture it, something to do with touching up the paint later on. I don't really know that much about paint except that I hate doing it. I had told the painter that if that is what it needed to go ahead and prime first then I'll texture then he could prime again then paint. All of this for a higher price of course. Before he started I talked to a friend that is in the drywall business and he called a big BS on the notion. He said look at it this way, texture is just drywall mud, the sheetrock is already covered with mud from all of the taping. If the painter is correct then you would have the same problem even if you prime before you texture because you don't prime before you tape. The primer ended up going on after the texture, saving one day and some money. I have read about putting a skim coat on the entire wall, but don't really see the sense in that either. More money for the contractor?
Just an aside from another thread that I read here about vapor barriers and insulation. The code (around here at least) has changed and they don't require a vapor barrier at all except under the house. If the sheetrock is sealed with a PVA primer and all of the outlet boxes and doors/windows and bottom plate are caulked they consider that enough.
CR
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.