new drywall on walls but use existing ceiling?

Some previous owner glued thin wood strips to the bathroom walls with an adhesive. This has been falling off for years. I want to replace it with clean painted walls. I have been trying to remove the adhesive but continue to accidentally gouge the drywall in the process.
The ceiling is fine shape. If I tear down all the drywall on the walls, will I be able to get a good seam with the existing ceiling? I know I would tape and mud the joint, but there will already be tape and mud on the ceiling from the previous joint.
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Dont worry...razor knife the ceiling wall "corner" joint, replace the wall drywall & re-tape / mud the new joint.
Are you sure that continuing to remove he adhesive & then using drywall mud to repair gouges wouldnt be less work than total wall replacement?
If the wall finish is going to be smooth you can easily mud & sand the repairs to match "smooth". Otherwise you can do the repairs & re- texture all the walls.
cheers Bob
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fftt wrote:

Repairing the old wallboard is what I did in my bath room. I scraped the glue off as best I could, then did a skim coat of drywall mud over the remaining gouges. It came out just fine. With a coat of paint the marks aren't visible.
Bill
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wrote:

Yup I agree with Bill..the only thing I will add is that if you get any bubbling up of furred paper just scrape it and hit it with mud again and again as necessary...If it is a small wall(s) just skim it all to reduce having to sand all the edges...Good luck with your project....
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thanks for the responses.
I've been planning to just scrape it off and repair as you all suggest. What's giving me pause is that it's a real wrist-breaker to get it off. I'm using a putty knife to scrape it and wet it down with a spray bottle to try and limit the amount of crap that flies all over me when I do it. But it takes a long time to clear a small section. Even though it's a tiny bathroom it will take many days to clear. That got me started thinking maybe it was easier to re-drywall.
Any suggestions on how to better remove the adhesive? The glue is dried to a dark brownish color.
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If the entire wall is covered with the wood strips, don't waste any more time on it. Pull down the old drywall, get it out to the curb and put up new. For tips on how to do it, download the 300+ page pdf USG Gypsum Construction Handbook or cruise the voluminous archives of this NG. Good luck.
Joe
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Another option, that is less work, is to put up new (thin) sheetrock over the existing sheetrock. It saves the time and trouble of tearing out the old stuff. Check your local yards and see what the thinnest sheetrock you can get.
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wrote:

Sure. I would expect to see a gap where the walls meet the ceiling. Clean out any loose mud. You can pre-fill larger gaps with Sheetrock 90 joint compound, then the next day smooth it out and embed paper tape in regular joint compound in the corner. You will have to apply 2-3 layers of joint compound, but do only one side of a corner per day to prevent damaging the other side. It is a time-consuming somewhat tedious process and you will do a better job with some patience. Use a work lamp to carefully inspect your work--there are many more flaws than you can see.
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