New dryer won't turn on

My mother in-law passed away recently and we ended up with her relatively new washer/dryer. It's a Maytag Performa. After a friend and I humped the old washer and dryer down the stairs to the garage and the new ones up, the dryer new plug did not match the receptacle. The receptacle was a three wire and the plug was a four wire. So I go and get a new one today and when I take the old one off, there are only three wires coming out of the wall. Two hots and a neutral. So I hook up the hots and the neutral, install the new recepticle etc. and hook the dryer back up. It won't turn on. I checked and the recepticle's hot. I took the access panel off the dryer and the dryer's hot. The green ground wire from the plug terminates on a sheet metal screw on the dryer housing, so I can't imagine that hooking this up without the ground connected would cause it not to run. I know it ran before. Does anyone know of a reset button on these or what I should do?
Thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Mark Corbelli" <corbellicrewatcomcastdotnet> wrote in message

Wrong two hots and a ground. Cable in the wall would have to have 4 wires to get a neutral.
So I hook up the hots and the neutral, install the new

Some appliances can work with out a neutral, some can not. Using the ground as a neutral can be hazardous. The manufacture should have directions in connecting the dryer with 3 wires.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The instructions aren't for sh*t. I can't believe a Home Depot sells amateurs a 220 V recepticle with practically no instructions. So anyway, I've got the dryer working by switching the white wire from ground to neutral, the red and black are hooked to what I would call "hot" as they both produce juice on my tester. So if it works, and it was only three wire before (17 years), should I be concerned?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Mark Corbelli" <corbellicrewatcomcastdotnet> wrote in message

I am pretty certain what you have in the wall should be called two phases and a neutral. Really kind of difficult to know what to call the wire in the box. Both return and grounds are tied together at the breaker box and will both serve as a return..
The heating elements are hooked between the two hots to get 220.
It needs 110 for the controls, so they are hooked between one of the hots and the return.
The ground pin on the dryer connector just fastens to the chassis.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 20 Oct 2005 17:22:14 -0400, "Mark Corbelli" <corbellicrewatcomcastdotnet> wrote:

They sell about 170 pages worth of instruction, nicely bound in a copper-colored cover, at the end of one of the aisles in the electrical section and/or down in their book/magazine displays, with the words "Wiring 123" printed on the cover in two inch letters.
You just decided not to buy them.
You should revisit that decision.
If you're bound and determined to skip the learning/research step and just make up shit whilest wiring your house, then HD is doing us all a favor by not trying to keep you alive in spite of yourself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry, my bad...I had hooked the neutral up to the ground wire. I switched it and now it works. Bah!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.