New chimney liner next to TV antenna, ground liner?

Just had two chimney liners installed for both the 1st floor wood stove and the basement oil furnace. We have a grounded TV antenna which is two feet from the liners. Does it make sense to ground the liners to the same ground system as the TV antenna.
Thank you for any help in this matter.
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This is an new question to me.
The NEC basically says that all metal piping systems should be grounded. Water, and gas are bonded by an conductor. A/c ducting is screwed to the unit so there is a bond there. The oil furnace is grounded cause of the motor connection you would think. Wood stove is well not powered so it is non grounded. Comes the question What are you trying to do? If your thinking that grounding the liners is lightning protection your sadly mistaken. If lightning is an issue then you really should look into a couple of finials and some cable. Grounding the tv antenna is only an sacrificial ground. If it gets hit by lightning, everything connected to it by either the coax or by power is probably going to be fried.
I would ask your local building official to be sure.
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A most serious protection system earths any conductive metal, within 2 meters of the downlead. That earthing must be to same earth ground as that downlead. IOW adjacent metal remains electrically isolated from the lightning conductor until they both meet at the same earth ground.
That is the concept in its purest form. You may not need such extreme measures. Yes, earthing the chimney liner to earth ground would be a better idea. But then a simpler and more effective solution may be to enhance - expand - the antenna's earth ground. How likely is a direct lightning strike going to strike the chimney liner? The better that antenna earth ground, then the more protected that chimney liner. Quality of that earth ground and using a earthing wire of 6 AWG or larger would earth most direct lightning strikes without damage.
What earth is the building located - both on the surface and 10+ feet beneath? If constructed in sand, then the antenna's earthing system must be substantial. Furthermore, that earthing is best installed with a buried connecting wire from antenna earth ground to the building's single point earth ground. That buried conductor both improves the antenna as a lightning rod AND enhances the entire building's earth ground connection.
Posted here is dependent on many details such as how the building is constructed, underlying geology, and history of direct strikes to neighborhood buildings. Provided are basic concepts of a good protection system. It is rare for lightning to find earth ground via a chimney liner. Almost impossible if the adjacent antenna is well earthed - acting as a Franklin lightning rod.
andy everett wrote:

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