new bathroom - tile question of staggered for floor, wall??

Hi I have just remodeled the main bathroom in my house... I am using marble for walls and floor.. The pattern for floor is staggered... For the wall, I was thinking of just going regular -meaning not staggered. I am also having glass between the tiles on the walls.. I figure by not doing staggered on the walls, it wont look so busy.. As this tile has a lot of veins and movement... Anyone else feel the same regarding doing staggered only on floor and not on wall Thanks KOS
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Any such question has to take into account tile design, tile color, tile size, grout line size, grout color, adjacent materials, lighting, etc., and as such it's entirely an aesthetic question - a personal opinion and nothing more.
R
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Might be worth a little money to consult a professional designer before you commit to something you may wind up detesting. If you like compliments on your work the fee would be worth it. Sympathy from your friends for a poor design would offset that if that's what you like.
Joe
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Great you get great decorating ideas here at althome repair, especialy since the blind can see the job, and help you as well. did you contact the Blind institute Of US, they can be there in person, because as you described it im still blind about what the f you want.
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What does "staggered" mean in tbis context? I tried to look it up on- line, but could not find a reference re: remodeling. Inquiring minds...
HB
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http://www.fairandsquaretile.com/bigblock1.jpg
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In masonry work that's called a running bond, as opposed to a stack bond (the typical tile grid layout). R
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I assume he means to stagger the tiles such that there isn't a continuous grout line. Could be staggered on the horizontal axis only or both I suppose. I'm kind of a classic straight line person myself.
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Like bricks on a house.
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On Mon, 24 Aug 2015 19:39:31 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I have seen "4 over" laid like that and it looks dumb. 4" tile screams 1950 anyway. I guess they were trying for a different look.
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On 8/24/2015 10:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Either way can work, it is a matter of personal taste. I don't like the staggered lines. Also, more cutting when you stagger them.
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KOS wrote:

I did stack bond with my tub/shower/sink/toilet surround, and am very happy with the results. Pretty much for the same reason as yourself, as I didn't want it to look as busy as a running bond.
You might also consider a stack bond for both, but with the floor tiles installed on a diagonal.
http://www.danielskitchenbath.com/diagonal%20floor%20border%20full.JPG
Jon
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On Apr 7, 9:00am, "Jon Danniken"

I was watching a DIY show the other day and they did something related to grout lines that I though was pretty neat. Maybe it's common practice, but I had never heard of it...
Because of some niches in the shower walls, some areas it would have required a very narrow piece of tile to keep the grout lines lined up, meaning more cuts and wasted tile.
Instead, they used the wet saw to cut a kerf in the face of a tile to simulate a grout line. According to the installer, once the grout was applied, you'd never know the difference.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Interesting technique, I like it. You get the structural strength of a whole tile, while maintaining the clean look of the grout lines. Makes sense, too, since all you have to do is provide a suffient enough shelf for the grout to fit into.
Jon
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Not too many people, if the typical tiled bath is any indication.
There's too many variables in your instance. Your bath might be 8x10, or 10x20. Visual "breaks" of patterns come into play, etc., and a picture couldn't provide sufficient perspective to make such a fundamental and subjective determination.
Personally, I wouldn't use marble that had prominent veining, if I were to choose marble for a bath, which I wouldn't. -----
- gpsman
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You could try taking a sheet of plywood and duct-taping (double-stick) some tiles in the pattern you want, to see what it would look like against the wall. Certainly it's also easy to try that on the floor- no tape or plywood required.
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