New a new refrigerator - any recommendations?

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See my other notes. I'll look into it simply because I've got a lot of stuff to sell before we move, or so my wife says when she stands by my bank of Pentium III machines with her arms crossed saying "THOSE are not coming with us."
I should have said I wanted experience with people who have bought new units recently. We might move next month or it might take years. My wife now wants to work until they force her out because her pension savings took such a mighty hit when the market collapsed in 2008.
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

Something made why Whirlpool, regardless of the brand -- Roper, Sears Kenmore, Costco Kirkland, Estate, or Ingilis. Avoid Maytag, one of the least reliable refrigerator brands, unless you can get proof in writing that it's a Whirlpool design (Whirlpool took over Maytag last year).
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On Sat, 26 Jun 2010 03:34:09 -0400, "Robert Green"

It doesn't make sense to buy a new frig--get a used one. When it is time to sell the house, you can sell it on Craigslist or use it as a bargaining item if the buyer doesnt have one.
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If you don't want the icemaker water in the door models, an common fridge can be had on Craigslist for cheap for one that is only a couple of years old. That's what I'd do.
A friend of mine HAD to have one of the icemaker water in the door models. Got one off Craigslist by placing a wanted ad, and got a 1.5 year old huge one that cost $1200 for $400.
One of the small simple ones should run $100-$200.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.
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Since it appears you are capable of working on your fridge, consider repairability as a criteria.
As an example, I was given a fairly new GE refrigerator that was not running. I'm pretty good at repairing appliances and figured I could get this one back online, no problem. PROBLEM! I discovered the failure was due to a bad temp controller and I went down to my local appliance parts place, and gave them the model and serial number. I knew and trusted these guys, from long association, and they told me this particular model, a low end one, was not worth the effort. They said the specialized tool needed to effect said repair would probably cost more than a similar model refrigerator. IOW, a disposable cheapie design.
I'd ask a parts or repair center about ease of rapair before choosing.
nb
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It seems that on most low price appliances that the cost to repair is not worth it. If the item is more than a few years old, you replace one part and a month later another part goes out. By the time you get two or three parts , you have the price of a new appliance. This is especially true if you have to pay someone to do the work.
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I threw away a good amount of money on two used refrigerators in my life. Now, I don't do that any more.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.
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not
part
three
That's what I would like to avoid. Good money after bad. We're eating everything in it so I can spend one last time checking it out, then we'll just get a new one. I am not convinced any of the new ones will be able to run over 30 years like this unit has. I just hope it lasts until we move out, and with wife's new assignment, that could easily be another 3 years. I can't see the real estate market stagnating for five years, but you never know.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

It won't, but do you really care?

It's already been four years. I have complete faith that Obummer will keep it going for at least another three and it'll be at least another two or three to recover. Five more? No problem. Remember the late '70s and early '80s, brought to you by the fiscal policies of Nixon, Ford, and particularly Obummer's mentor, Carter. I believe the appropriate terms are "malaise" and "stagflation".
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could
They
probably
life.
to
Nah, now that you mention it, *I* don't think I'll be running for another 30 years, so why worry? The cost savings are proving to be enormous. This unit uses the same amount of juice in two weeks that the old box used in three days! And it's much colder, too. The only issue is that I will probably have to buy an extra shelf. The unit came with only one and that's certainly not enough. How much do you think they'll gouge me for an extra shelf?

years.
never
keep it

three to

I am trying hard to forget them. In 1980, I bought my first new car with a 20% APR. OUCH!

and
Japan had over a decade of it. The problem is that each new crisis is radically different from the old one. Now, the world's economies are so intertangled that if Greece takes a hard punch, some small country somewhere else in the world falls over as a result. It's hard to know which way to turn. It's clear that there are as many proposed solutions are there are economists.
-- Bobby G.
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 19:56:34 -0400, "Robert Green"

No idea. Probably something ridiculous. You should be able to find them online.

We bought our first house in ,82. When we started looking the 30-year fixed mortgages were going above 18%, though when we finally closed we got what we thought was a bargain at 14.5%. We now have a 4.25% mortgage.

Every one is different because governments act differently. We'd be well on the way to a recovery now if the government didn't keep driving stakes into the economy's heart.
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On 6/28/2010 10:08 AM, notbob wrote:

I checked out a refrigerator for a fellow I knew a while back after his house was hit by lightning. It damaged a lot of stuff including blowing electrical outlets out of the wall. Anyway, he had a very nice fridge that quit running, a model with all sorts of digital readouts and electronic controls. The compressor was OK but the microprocessor based control board located in a compartment in the back of the fridge was toast. A new board was more than $100.00 my cost. I fixed a simple fridge for my friends daughter who's home was hit by lighting and the capacitor, evaporator fan motor and defrost timer cost a lot less than the fancy computer control of the the other folk's refrigerator. The lesson being that you may want to forego fancy bells and whistles when you choose a refrigerator.
TDD
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No kidding. I've seen them with a comuter (PC) with touch screen on the door. Lord knows what those cost to repair.
The one I had was that old GE/Amana/etc avocado-colored workhorse that millions bought in the 60s. Frostless, top freezer, etc. I salvaged mine cuz, despite still working, was not very efficient and I was moving states away. OTOH, I knew of half a dozen just like it still doing duty in ppl's homes (two on my block) as their primary or garage beer fridge. My dog could repair it! ;)
nb
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On 6/29/2010 10:12 AM, notbob wrote:

A KISS fridge? 8-)
TDD
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wrote:

Does your dog make house calls? He's the right height to get to the compressor and probably doesn't have bad knees.
The temperature of the upper and lower compartments follows the room temperature, no matter where the dials are set. The problem has been coming on slowly, and started last summer. Since we've moved away from AC and the kitchen can run from 60F to 90F, it's only a problem when the air temp is above 76F.
It used to go below -10F. Now it rarely goes below 8F (I know because I bought a great wireless refrigerator thermometer set with hi/lo memories some recommended here).
I've had to defrost it several times manually (and impatiently - I didn't just let it stand, I used hot water and a hair dryer to defrost it) from the door being left ajar on a humid night and the freezer coil condensate drain hose getting plugged. I believe the last time this happened I may have put a pinhole leak in the unit, although I haven't tested for it. Could also be that after 30+ years, this old White-Westinghouse has bitten the dust. Compressors don't last forever.
I just pulled the freeze floor up to check the coils and the fan. The coils were really gurgling, a lot more than I remembered and I know from car A/C work that gurgling usually means low refrigerant. From what I read, finding the leak, repairing and recharging it are a little out of my league. I might pay a reasonable amount to have it done, but I also know that old cars and appliances reach an age where they can out-cost a new one in repairs and efficiency.
So, ask your dog: am I right that this isn't a job for a formerly handy person who can't get down on his knees if the good lord commanded it?
-- Bobby G.
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