Neutralize Muriatic acid

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Drained Pool (pending)!
How or what can I use to neutralize Muriatic acid/water pool ?
I plan to acid wash the in ground pool walls. While I'm busy there (walls) the acid wash will pool at the deep end of the pool.
I would like to toss/pour something into the puddle that would neutralize acid; until I can pump it out.
Thanks!!
Oren
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Oren wrote:

Any base. Bicarbonate of soda is cheap and easy. If the mix fizzes and doesn't stop you need more bicarb.
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dadiOH
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add water and pump down sewer. sometimes the soultion is dilution.
a chemical fizzing in your pool might damage it
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On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 16:40:34 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

If I neutralize the acid wash, can't I pump back into the yard? And not send it down the sewer.

The reason I want to neutralize the mixture... as I work.
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I would not suggest pumping into the yard. The product of bicarbonate and muriatic acid is sodium chloride (salt) solution. Your lawn may not like that.
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On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 18:05:06 -0500, Gary Dyrkacz.

Thanks. The majority of my yard is desert rock landscape, but you're right. I do have plants and trees :)
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I would greatly dilute it (run a constant stream of water into the bottom of the pool) and pump it out constantly. Otherwise the (still active) acid will eat away the grout at the bottom of the pool. You may end up with a very pebbly finish or you may destroy the grout in that area completely.
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Walter
www.rationality.net
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Thanks. I'm reading two pounds of soda ash will neutralize one gallon of muriatic acid.
My acid wash will already be diluted (1 part acid to 4-6 parts water).
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Oren wrote:

Be sure to add the acid TO the water, not water to acid. Wrong way violent bubbling/splashing and is dangerous.
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dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote in message ...

water).
Yes, I found that out the hard way. :-)
Cheri
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dadiOH wrote:

Reminds me of highschool chemistry class.
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Muriatic does not react to water violently, so I would take the previous posters Bull Shit here to bull shit, Muriatic FUMES, Muriatic eats metal pipe. It wont react to added water as sulfuric will, I use Muriatic, maybe even tomorrow AM to clean stone.
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ransley wrote:

It is your option to be foolish. http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/safety/faq/always-add-acid.shtml
http://www.google.com/search?q d+acid+to+water&sourceid=mozilla-search&start=0&start=0&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
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On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 20:59:05 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Muriatic acid can splatter, emit caustic fumes, corrode metal, cause skin burns and blindness. It contains HCl, one of the strongest acids. If diluted properly (adding acid TO the water), it becomes less hazardous. Not a wise idea to have a bottle of it laying around.
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wrote:

It becomes a bomb with Aluminum foil:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pg8LU5Mo6L8

I always add acid to water.
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wrote:

The rule of acid to water is a good one for the non chemist, and usually for chemists as well. It is a general rule of thumb that is just easy to remember and follow. If you understand the characteristics of what you are working with, then you can bend the rules, but with the proper techniques and understanding. The unwise should never add water to acid. It is clear from most of the posts, that the general rule of acid to water should be followed by just about eveyone responding to this post.
All concentrated mineral acids develop heat when mixed with water. The problem is that some acids, like concentrated sulfuric acid are prone to a highly localized and large release of heat of mixing. The dissolution especially in this case becomes violent, with subsequent violant spattering of acid due to localized steam generation.
Do chemist ever do the reverse with acids? Sure, but not before carefully thinking about how they will control the mixing conditions and adjusting for the consequences.
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ransley wrote:

It does a number on concrete -
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ransley wrote:

I strongly disagree with your recommendation to ignore basic acid safe handling. Adding acid to water is always safer because the acid is safely dilluted as it is poured. Adding water to acid (especially a granular form of an acid such as sodium bisulfate but also for liquid/aqueous acid solution) results in working with a very strong solution, which isn't something you want to mess around with or risk splashing.
Yes it is true that pure water added to muriatic acid (which contains water by definition) will not cause a reaction in itself, but that is beside the point made for safe handling. Treat muriatic/hydrocholoric acid (and any strong acid) with a great deal of respect. I would strongly recommend wearing acid safe gloves and a mask. One little splash of a drop can do a lot of permanent and painful damage to an eye, to say nothing of other body parts.
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Body parts, Ive had Muriatic drip over my hands for a day with no injurie, eyes are different , get it Real/
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ransley wrote:

If that is the case than you are working with fairly weak HCl solution!! What its strength in moles?
The HCl I work with regularly would put dissolve skin fairly quickly. I stand by all of my comments regarding acid handling safety. For many people, swimming pools is the first time they encounter such chemicals, and there are some things that are best not learned first hand.
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