Neutral and Ground Wires In Panel Box

Hello guys, in my breaker box the neutral wires and ground wires are together in the same bus. In other words, two wires under same screw in bus (one neutral / one ground) is this correct?
TIA,
Tim
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Scott wrote:

Probably.
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The panel should be marked for what it accepts, but generally two ground wires under one screw is OK, but not two neutrals or combinations

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Technically the terminals are probably only approved for one wire each. Practically speaking jurisdictions in Texas when I was a contractor years ago, allowed three #12 wires under one screw. A #6 wire which is what a lot of these are approved for will be several smaller wires twisted together. Two or three # 12 wires shouldn't be much different but they may not be approved.
As for a ground and a neutral being on the same bar, the ground must be bonded to the neutral at the first means of disconnect. If your breaker box contains the first main breaker disconnect for your system, then it is okay for them to be together. Leave them alone; they are bonding with each other :-)
If you have a main outside and your breaker panel is inside, that might be a problem. If your panel is a secondary panel or sub-panel, then the grounds should have a separate bar from the neutral. The bonding between the neutral and the grounds should only be at one place and that place should be at the first means of disconnect. If it were otherwise, under a fault situation, surge current from the fault would divide proportionately to the resistances of the multiple paths back to ground. That would put fault currents in your neutrals.
There are other issues such as rf currents, induction, and noise that could interfere with electronic circuitry through out your working system in case of a fault.
In reality, it happens all the time, and it usually isn't a big deal. It is not optimal, and it could be a serious problem in certain circumstances.
Randy R. Cox
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Scott wrote:

In the US the answer is no. YMMV Each current carrying conductor, including the neutral; must terminate in it's own terminal. Most panels are listed for multiple, usually two, Equipment Grounding Conductors in a single terminal.
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