Neighbor with bright light

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My next door neighbor has one of those big bright "barn yard" mercury vapor lights mounted up high on a 40ft. telephone pole (power company rented light). Recently, the bulb burned out in it; I thought this was great because my family could be outside at night or swimming in the pool without a glaring harsh light shining in our eyes and putting up with the old lady watching us through her cracked window blinds (thinking we can't see her; yeah right), but the power company came a few days ago and changed it, now it is 3X brighter then ever. It shines through my bedroom window blinds.
My neighbor is an old lady who thinks someone will break into her house if she doesn't have a industrial light in her back yard, Frankly, I think she only has it there so she can watch what the neighbors are doing at night; thats all. There isn't much crime in my town.
Could I call the power company to have it sheilded or disconnected? or to at least tell them to replace it with a normal-sized porch motion flood light? These damn lights are responsible for polluting the sky at night.
BTW: I told her about it; I asked her politely to do something about it, but she doesn't ever listen to anyone.
Thanks, John
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Call the power company and complain. If that doesnt work see if there are laws in your town about outdoor lighting. Take pictures and videos and go to court if necessary. Or get a light abd shine it in her window!!!
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@backpacker.com wrote:

pellet gun - every time it's replaced
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snipped-for-privacy@nf.sympatico.ca wrote:

I actually thought of that, but from the angle of the bullet would be facing my house, it would seem to obvious who shot it and figuring I complained about the light; she would suspect me of shooting it out and call the cops.
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On 1 Jun 2006 04:00:14 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

===============So hop over the fence and do the deed from differewnt angles...LOL Seriously call the power company and request that they shield the light...
I am a backyard astronomer and any light can absolutely destroy my night vision so I understand how I would feel if I were in your position... finding a dark sky "site" is almost impossible anywhere in the USA right NOW !
Bob G
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

There is no law against being a "suspect," nor can you be arrested for "suspicion" of anything.
With suitable arguments, light can be a public nusiance, just like noise, odor, overhanging trees, unsightly junk, or even nudity. Just being on your own property does not immunize one from complaints.
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HeyBub wrote There is no law against being a "suspect," nor can you be arrested for "suspicion" of anything.
===================
Sure, tell that to the Duke Lacrosse team.
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Gideon wrote:

The actual charges were First Degree Forcible Rape, First Degree Sexual Offense, and Kidnapping. To be arrested, one must be charged with an actual crime. There is no crime in North Carolina enumerated as "Suspicion of ...." anything.
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Huh? You don't get charged until AFTER you get arrested.
Cop pulls you over under suspicion of DUI. Gives you some road side tests, and in his opinion, you're illegal drunk. He arrests you. You go before a judge and you're charged with driving under the influence. You were arrested before you were charged.
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wrote:

You are always arrested on "suspicion" of comitting a crime. It's suspicion until you get convicted. You can also be arrested for "Intention". They read you mind and just know you are thinking about doing something illegal.
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Mys Terry wrote You are always arrested on "suspicion" of comitting a crime. It's suspicion until you get convicted. You can also be arrested for "Intention". They read you mind and just know you are thinking about doing something illegal.
=========== I wasn't arrested, but I was once pulled over by a cop who said that he "knew" that I was going to roll through a stop sign if I hadn't seen him nearby.
I politely asked if I had actually broken any laws. "No, not really."
I politely asked how he "knew" that I intended to break the law. "I just know from experience."
What a freakin' dumb ass.
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Many years ago, a friend of mine was being followed around a department store by a security person, because he "didn't look right". In other words, it was the 1960's and he had long hair and a beard. My friend decided to respond by playfully ducking behind counters in an exaggerated manner, and generally playing cat and mouse with the jerk. The end of the story, however, was that he was arrested for "Intent to shoplift". He was convicted and had to pay a fine. I think he got a term of probation as well.
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Mys Terry wrote:

Heh! The closest one can get today is "conspiracy" to do something. But "conspiracy" is an agreement between two or more to commit some unlawful act coupled with an affirmative act in furtherance of the conspiracy.
"Intent" is often an element of an offense, but it is not an offense per se. For example: "burglary" is defined as the entering of a building (often a dwelling) with the intent to commit a felony or the crime of theft. Now the "intent" on the part of the accused burglar can often be inferred by a rational person (the TV, stereo, and jewlry were stacked by the front door...), but mere intent is never an offense - intent is often necessary, but intent alone is never sufficient to establish the crime. There must be some overt act as a necessary element of the offense.
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What about all the alleged "child molestors" who are locked up for thirty years and labled sex offenders for life because they arrive at some police sting operation with the "intent" of having sex with a 15 year old girl.
In reality there is no 15 year girl... she was made up by some police officer surfing on the Internet and up till the moment of arrest, no one was harmed. There is no victim.
The person being arrested and convicted is being punished purely for their thoughts about what they might want to do or thought about doing, in other words, intent.
Beachcomber
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snipped-for-privacy@notreal.none (Beachcomber) wrote:

Most are arrested for solicitation or similar wording where, under the statute, they have already done the crime. The stings are merely a way to make the arrest. Like sending people with outstanding warrants invitations to pick up their free Yankees tickets.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote: ..>

Local laws are all different. I would suggest starting with the power company as they may take car of it as you suggest and they are likely to be familiar with the local regulations.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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If its brighter now a larger watt bulb was put in, there are local laws. It depends on how far you want to go with it, maybe a letter from you could explain it to her, maybe she could keep it off till an hour you are not outside. Neighbor fights can get nasty.
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bulb. The power limiting effects of the ballast won't allow for that by much. More likely the HID lamp will never come up to operating temp and overheat the ballast. burning it out. Mercury bulbs can run for many years past their lifetime at greatly reduced output. When the new bulb got installed, it seems to be very bright.
In response to the other post about shooting the light. For one thing it is unlawful and second, the outer envelope of the lamp may break while the inner arc tube remains intact. Without the outer envelope to block harmful UV radiation, the mercury lamp is a powerful emitter of UV that can damage the eyes and skin.
A metal shield can be fitted to the lamp to block out much of the light in certain directions.
John
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I live at the end of a long cul de sac and our streets in San Diego are scantilly lit. However I am lucky (?) enough to have one of the three street lights on the block right outside my front door. They use this weird orangish bulb to cut down on light pollution for Mt Palomar observatory. They are shockingly bright when new. My front yard is lit up like a rock concert. It's kinda creepy at first as everything is color shifted. I don't like it but they aren't gonna switch to mercury vapor.
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On Thu, 01 Jun 2006 11:49:04 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

Buy one of those million-candlepower spotlights. Aim it at the yard-light. If it's got a daylight sensor on it, that will turn the thing off.
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