Neighbor problem

Page 1 of 4  
How would you handle this?
We've lived here 17 yrs, rather a "newbie" in the neighborhood. Rest of neighbors pretty much lived in the area since the homes were built 30 yrs ago.
This concerns lot boundaries. The neighbors on both sides of me would mow close to the center between the houses. My house is just 44 ft wide with garage in front. on a 88 ft wide lot. All lots are 88 ft wide. The one neighbors house is 36 ft wide with a 21 ft side attached garage. Other neighbor is 33 ft wide with a 21 ft side attached garage.
Both neighbors like to mow super short which burns out their yards but they don't have to mow but once a week or bi-weekly this way. I like keeping my grass tall and mow twice a week.
I finally had a survey done, of course the boundary lines are not the center between the houses. I have more side yard because my house takes up less space.
Both neighbors seen the survey stakes and iron pipe. The one started mowing where his property leaves off instead of mowing part of my yard. The other neighbor continues to mow down the center. I wouldn't care but as I said he mows so cotton picken short he burns out my grass.
I approached him and tried to make light of the subject by telling him "just keep coming over so I don't have to mow any side yard". After a couple times of him just continuing going down the center, I pointed out I had the property surveyed and would appreciate if he was going to mow my yard, please raise his mower when he comes onto my property. Now, this guy is one of the originals in the neighborhood. Kinda getting up there in age, set in his ways etc. Don't know if he feels he has seniority for living in the neighborhood or what the problem is. He mows about 10-12 ft over onto my property. The whole neighborhood pretty much takes care of their places, except for the ones that mow so short dirt starts flying.
Oh, my neighborhood you can't put a fence up out front or side, just rear property fencing, which is from rear of house back. I sit with a 40 ft frontage, 26 ft wide on a 190' depth. I really don't want to fence the back yard.
I got the survey to ease my mind, I've asked nicely, now where do I go from here?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rod wrote:

You may have a bigger problem than you think. In some areas, local laws may give some form of property right to a neighbor who cars for and uses part of your land if you don't object. You could loose use or even ownership of that land. In some areas that is not the case.
I suggest you may want to check this out with your lawyer.
Even if this is not a legal problem in your area, you may be able to use your lawyer to help out. Maybe, the lawyer could provide counsel to you that you might be responsible for any injury the neighbor might have while mowing your grass, and therefore you must insist that he no longer mow your grass. You might even get a letter from your lawyer to the neighbor. That way you can put the blame on the law.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joseph Meehan writes:

It's called "adverse possession", and would never apply to this type of situation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Did you ever hear of Adverse Possession, you better learn. He is caring for "his "property in the eyes of the court. You need to stop him, put up some plants and take care of Your property. Has he put up plants or a part fence ? They must go. Yes I know about this, Im in court with a %$#@ ^&*% suing me. Write him a letter certified mail stating he MAY continue to mow if he does so at the proper height and that he has your permission to walk there, this will stop his Easement rights. He must aknowledge the letter and sign it . Learn at FreeAdvise.com
Then again he could be innocent and ignorant. Be carefull or you will have a mess and an enemy on your hands. Bushes and plants are the quiet way of stopping him.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
m Ransley wrote:

The legal issue is a serious one, although I have no idea how it applies where I live.
I agree that plants could be the simple solution to a potentially serious dispute. Worth a try, IMO. Make sure none of the branches hang over the property line :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Civil war is the only answer available.
Only the strong will survive.
Exterminate the christian jew cop government.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"m Ransley" strikes again! Nothing useful OR authoritative...just drivel for the sake of a post.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

never have seen it. Thanks for nothing.
Just killfile Ransley. I think nearly everyone else here already has.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hey, just trying to "cleanse" the group. But you're right. Next time I'll <clip>
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I saw a neighbor put up a row of small evergreen trees in a mulched bed along the property line. That same neighbor still mows over onto the other neighbor's property. Go figure...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rod wrote:

If you can't dissuade the neighbor from mowing your lawn and can't put up a fence, what about planting a hedge just inside your property line? Or a line of fast-growing trees? Or a vegetable or flower or rock garden?
FurPaw
--

"Like the reason a dog
Has so many friends
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

FICUS Bushes ruin grass the best.
Civil War 2004

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd go along with what another person said and plant a bed along the property line. Just spray a strip of the grass with Roundup, let the grass die and plant some sort of hedge plant this fall. You could also put mulch around the plants to make it look better. Some good candidates (depending on where you're from) are Arborvitae, Yew, Forsythia, Privet, Red-Twig Dogwood, Juniper amongst others.
Another poster commented about you losing the land because another had been using it. From my experience this does not hold true in a sub-division. The lots in a sub-division would not change shape because a guy mowed the lawn in the wrong place for a few years. Those sort of laws usually involve rural land use situations from my experience...
Rob PA
Rod wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hard to say for sure, but why not try a pre-emptive strike. Mow your lawn before he gets out there and perhaps he won't bother doing it again.
You could put a few plantings in to define the property line for a BIG hint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

If the neighbour is mowing the lawn shorter, then he'll probably re-mow the lawn anyway.
Before planting anything or calling a lawyer, I'd suggest talking to the neighbour again and being firm and direct - politely tell him that you want to maintain your own yard, and that he should stop mowing at the property line. If this still doesn't work, then a hedge would be a good alternative to mark the boundaries of the lot. Getting a lawyer involved would likely just sour relations with the neighbour and cost more than the problem is worth.
Regards,
George Wenzel
--
George Wenzel, B.A. (Criminology)
E-mail: snipped-for-privacy@recursor.invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Just the opposite... the OP should fertilize and water the section being mowed so it grows faster than the neigthbor can mow it...
-a|ex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

redundant.
Pour grass killer on 10-12 feet of his property to see how he likes it and hope for civil war so he could legally kill the christian jew cop squatter.
The justice system is inept.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Conversation is best. Making sure your neighbor is aware that your yard is important to you, not just that you are taking over cause it's yours..............that kinda thing.
If negotiaitions fail then buy some 3/4" re-bar and make some strong stakes to put up, string them for a while and make sure you put them in just far enough that your mower clears them and the neighbors mower will not If he ruins his mower it's his fault.
Hell, red flag 'em for a couple of months too. make sure he has plenty of "signs" to read each time he mows so he can have a chance to get the message.It's your yard.
but by all means try some conversation first.
Remove "YOURPANTIES" to reply
MUADIB
http://www.angelfire.com/retro/ssterile/MAIN%20PAGE.html
It's is not, it isn't ain't, and it's it's, not its, if you mean it is. If you don't, it's its. Then too, it's hers. It isn't her's. It isn't our's either. It's ours, and likewise yours and theirs. -- Oxford University Press, Edpress News
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This has to be the worst advice on this topic to date. If he or someone else were to be injured from striking a rebar he planted,he could be jailed,and severely fined,perhaps even lose his home.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik-at-kua.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.