Need your advice on a good inside automotive tire patch

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clare wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 21:56:43 -0500:

I wasn't saying that the BBS part was better but I easily see how you may have construed that.
I was assuming (just guessing, really) that an expensive allow rim would likely run truer than a cheap steel wheel.
BTW, I also tested rim runout, which is *easy* once you have a tire changing machine and a static balancer because you can spin the rim on the tools with a dial gauge mounted on the wall or even with a flat wall nearby and a feeler gauge.
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 04:47:30 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

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On Mon, 7 Dec 2015 16:45:40 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

I just use "strings", with rubber cement, and it works well. I follow the instructions.
I used to use "plugs'.
My probe/rasp tool finally broke, so I bought a better quality one. Maybe I bought a better quality of both.

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wrote:

an emergency - reluctantly.
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clare wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 15:37:51 -0500:

I keep the T-shaped handle thing in my car for emergencies. What I really need, for emergencies, is air. I keep buying that liquid-air stuff, and it keeps going bad.
What I really need is simply a tire-valve-hose.
That way, I can suck some air out of the other four tires to fill the one tire that is temporarily patched from the outside in a super emergency.
Problem is, there are never any emergencies. The spare works just fine when I get a flat.
So, why repair on the road from the outside?
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I did see a man put the patch on his tire and use one of the battery powered pumps to pump up the tire. Not sure if he had a spare or not. It was on something like a station wagon and to get to the spare he would have had a long time removing all the stuff he had in the back over the tire.
A girl was over at our house visiting my son. She had a flat and I changed it for her. Her trunk was filled with stuff. It took her about 20 minuits to get it all out. Yard looked we were having a yard sell.

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Ralph Mowery wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 17:39:38 -0500:

I wonder how long it would take to fill a tire with those small bicycle pumps?
It takes about a hundred pumps to fill a bicycle tire.
Whaddya think? About 1,000 pumps?
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 01:40:43 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

inch-ish units with a footplate and a "T" handle- can pump a 225/70 15 tire faster than the average 12 volt compressor by a factor of about 2 if you are in good shape or have a "second" to spell you off.
Took about 50 strokes to take tire from 15 to 30 psi. - that's just a couple minute's work.
I used to have to blow up tires on farm wagons with one of those pumps as a young feller. Thankfully they were tube type tires - seating a bead on a tubeless tire with a hand pump would be a trick (use ether and throw a match if you get stuck having to do the deed)
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clare wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 22:11:22 -0500:

I've done it, for fun, with almost anything flammable (I think I used carb cleaner or MAF cleaner as I recall). It blows up fast. Really really really fast. And it's loud!
Luckily, once I got the HF tire-changing tool, seating the bead is no problem. Just a bit of Dawn or Palmalive and the 4 foot long red tire iron that comes with the tool is all you need.
My medium-profile thinwall tires are a breeze. A SUV is much harder.
All depends on the tire sidewall thickness (thinner is easier).
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On 12/7/2015 5:00 PM, Danny D. wrote:

I'll continue to use my 12 volt compressor from Harbor Freight.
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On Mon, 7 Dec 2015 22:00:05 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

and it's too nasty to put everything in the trunk on the side of the road to get the spare out. Or when the spare is flat too.
A 12 volt compressor or a good manual tire pump is a lot better than canned air
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clare wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 18:38:42 -0500:

Probably true.
1. The advantage of canned air is that sealant is often included, and it doesn't require electricity and it's small but it goes bad over time.
2. The advantage of a compressor is that it doesn't go bad over time but it's much larger and it requires electricity (which is usually ok except the cigarette lighter is FAR away from the rear tires if you keep the wheels on the car). On a bimmer, the battery is far from the front axle. On most cars, it's the opposite, but you still have that problem.
3. The advantage of a hose that goes from one side of one axle to the other side of the other axle is that it's small, it never goes bad, but it does suck some air out of the other three tires. If you're lucky, you can suck air out of someone else's tires! :)
The main disadvantage is that you have to make it out of a hose and two chucks, one of which has to latch on and the other has to have some way of shutting off (which most chucks do). The biggest problem is that the chucks are usually pretty big, so that necessitates a bigger hose than you want (or need) to store.
My plan is to build a long thin hose, with two hoses on the end that are thicker which contain the two chucks. Dunno if it would work though, as I don't know how much air you have to scavenge from three other tires to fill up one tire.
Of course, in a parking lot, there are lots of tires ... :)
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 01:39:36 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Some do go bad just sitting. Hoses rot, and compressor pistons corrode from misuse.

Don't bet on them not going bad. Ozone damage to the hose can leave you with a popped hose.

GM vehicles with air ajustable suspension - to use the air ride compressor to blow up tires (or footballs, or swimming tubes, or whatever) I have 2 of them - must be if to 20 feet long each.

You would need to take almost 1/3 of the air out of each of 3 other tires to blow up one empty tire.

And a possible vandalism charge - or more.
A good 1.25 to 2" bore tire pump is just as fast as the 12 volt compressor - needs no electricity, and doesn't need to steel are from your other tires. Makes you sweat a bit = but many of us need the exercise anyway.
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clare wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 22:04:14 -0500:

Nice. I need to find a set of me! (My bimmer doesn't have air suspension.)
It's hard to find a picture based on your description. Is this what yours look like?
http://s26.photobucket.com/user/T-Mac8_/media/Compressorhose003.jpg.html
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 04:50:20 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

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On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 01:39:36 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

I carried a 12 v compressor for years when flat tires were more common. Never had to use it for a flat as I recall, but it came in handy for pumping up slow leaks, and after plugging a couple tires. I cut off the cig lighter plug and simply extended the cord with an old 20' extension cord, and added alligator clips. Always hooked it up directly to my battery. Small package, but slow to pump. Prefer a foot operated pump. Carried canned air for a while, and used it one time for a nail puncture until I could get home and plug it. I swear it's been 20 years since I've had a flat.
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On Mon, 7 Dec 2015 22:00:05 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

They used to sell those for just this purpose. Probably at JCWhitney. Havent' seen one for sale for 20 or 30 years.

I had an occasion where the hole was showing and it was just as easy to patch it on the car as off. The car was here, not on the road.
Another occasion when I couldn't get the tire off, but in that case the hole wasn't showing or I didn't have any strings with me. I forget.
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wrote:

I should add that with the strings, you stuff the folded string in the hole, then when the probe is in the tire, you rotate it a couple turns, and that make a "ball" of string inside the tire, so the string doesn't come out. That's why the probe shouldn't be a comple 0, but have an opening in the side, like a C, so that it will come loose and you can pull it out without any of the string.

They worked well too.

Some webpage pointed to by some post here said holes up to 1/4" but my impression is that a 3/8 or evne 1/2 screw makes a hole that is bigger than 1/4" when something is holding the hole open, but closes down to almost nothing when the screw is removed. ???
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wrote:

and the "plug" needs to fill the hole right to the cords - so no - the hole sdoes not "close in" requiring or allowing a smaller plug. It closes down to LOOK like a smaller hole.
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On Mon, 07 Dec 2015 18:26:23 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Okay. I forgot about cords.
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