Need your advice on a good inside automotive tire patch

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Ed Pawlowski wrote, on Thu, 10 Dec 2015 22:13:42 -0500:

Yup. Convenience plays a role.
For me, since I already own the tire mounting/dismounting and balancing tools, it's convenient for me to repair my own tires properly.
But, for others, I can see how it might not be convenient for them to repair their own tires properly.
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wrote:

I never knew they make such a thing. Sounds like a good idea though. A local tire shop will patch a tire for $10 or less, so I just let them do it. Getting tires off and on rims is not easy without a "tire machine" and I still would not be able to balance them....
I will fix bicycle tires, those small tires on garden tractors and wheelbarrows though. Most of the time I just put a tube in them. Those small tires seem to always leak around the rims no matter how well they are mounted. Tubes solve that, and those small tubes are not very costly.
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Paintedcow wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:13:55 -0600:

You live in a different world than I live in, because NOTHING is $10 "or less" at a repair shop. Absolutely NOTHING. Maybe you live in Kansas or Texas, or some other cheap state, but this is California. Absolutely nothing is $10.
I just called three local tire-related shops. Most charged $30 for just the patch (not the patchplug). The cheapest was $20 for a plug from the outside only.
Anyway, the cost isn't the issue. They *never* do the job right.
It's not that they don't KNOW how. It's that their CUSTOMER generally doesn't know how. So, they cheat.
Every single time. You can NOT get a good job from them, unless you ride herd on them, and you may as well just do it yourself.
Besides, I've changed and mounted my own tires using the Harbor Frieght tool. For low-profile performance tires on aluminum rims, the job is EASY. As easy (almost) as changing brakes and rotors.
It's not difficult at all (until/unless you get to the really thick sidewall tires such as SUV tires - which ARE harder!).
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I like the deal I got at Tire Discount. They rotate the tires for free and will patch anyones tire in the famialy for free if they give them your telephone number. I have not used the repair service, but while waiting on a rotation I was talking to a man and he told me this was his 4 th repair. The dealer treated him just as good as if he was buyin 4 new tires and told him to come back if he has another flat.
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Ralph Mowery wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 15:21:16 -0500:

This is the same deal (almost) that Costco gives. Costco, if you bought from them, will repair for free.
Problem with Costco is the huge wait. Dunno about Tire Discount's wait.
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When I got the tires (they had to order them) I set up a time to be there and was taken right away. For the rotations so far there may have been one person ahead of me. Guess that it could be the time of day as to how busy they are. Being retired I usually go during the week around 10:00.
The do have a big window with some stools where you can look at them doing the work. They use some impact wrenches on the nuts, but do a final tightning with a torque wrench.
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Danny D. wrote:

You don't balance them when installing yourself?
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Tony Hwang wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:36:21 -0700:

Of course I do. I balance them *statically*. If you want, I'll snap a picture of my mounting and balance tools.
I use the stickon weights from HF. I bought quarter ounce zinc weights (California has a thing about lead). But I found 1/2 ounce is fine so next time I'll buy 1/2 ounce instead.
There is no vibration. At any speed. Yes I fully know EVERYONE swears you must dynamically balance. I know that.
But, guess what? My wheels don't vibrate. At any speed.
So what does that tell you?
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When I worked for Sears around 1970 all we had was the bubble balancer. I was told to slide the weights around the wheel in pairs, put one on the bottom and then put the other on the top for the final balance. Don't know if this did anything,but was the standard for them.
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On Mon, 7 Dec 2015 17:35:00 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

On some tires it helped - on others it made it worse. Dynamic balancing balances the tire not only around the circumference bur from bead to bead - across the tread - and it does this inner to outer ballance at every point around the circumference of the tire. A tire can be statically ballanced and "wobble" like crazy, even though it does not "tramp".. It is more important on wheels with a large offset, either positive or negative, because the moving impalance is farther from the point where the contact patch and the steering axis meet.
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On Mon, 7 Dec 2015 21:58:04 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

If your tires don't shake at any speed balancing only to the closest half ounce you are not very sensitive to shake or you don't drive very fast is all I can say.
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clare wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 18:36:19 -0500:

Maybe both are true.
I am not all that sensitive to anything (watch when people try to insult me, for example). And I don't go yelling out the window at someone who talks on their cellphone or who cuts me off. I just ignore them.
I also don't drive all that fast. Maybe 80 to 85 on the highway at most, which, as you know, is nothing on a California highway (I don't call 'em freeways 'cuz they're not free - CA has the highest gas tax in the nation).
Plus, I balanced them really well.
I have nothing against dynamic balancing except that it's not always needed. That's all.
If you mount and balance your own tires, the only thing that is hard to do is the dynamic balancing. Everything else is trivially easy to do at home. And cheap. All the tools cost less than one visit to the shop.
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On 12/7/2015 8:27 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Not according to this: http://taxfoundation.org/blog/how-high-are-gas-taxes-your-state
This week’s tax map takes a look at state gasoline tax rates, using data from a recent report by the American Petroleum Institute. Pennsylvania has the highest rate of 51.60 cents per gallon (cpg), and is followed closely by New York (45.99 cpg), Hawaii (45.10 cpg), and California (42.35 cpg). On the other end of the spectrum, Alaska has the lowest rate at 12.25 cpg, but New Jersey (14.50 cpg) and South Carolina (16.75 cpg) aren’t far behind. These rates do not include the additional 18.40 cent federal excise tax.
Combined rate here http://www.api.org/~/media/files/statistics/gasoline-tax-map.pdf
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Ed Pawlowski wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 22:54:59 -0500:

Not really true. You were snowed.
Like any statistic, you have to look at the full picture.
California ostensibly *lowered* the gas tax recently; but they *raised* the sales tax.
To count one and not the other isn't telling the true story.
For example, this is from 2014, but look at the numbers: http://www.foxandhoundsdaily.com/2014/03/californias-gas-tax-nightmare/
"California consumers currently pay 71 cents per gallon in taxes every time they fill up their tanks. That’s the highest gas tax rate in the country. The average American pays less—about 50 cents per gallon."
It's sort of like your phone bill. You have to look at *all* the taxes and so-called "fees", which, on purpose, they break into a billion little pieces, just so they can fool people like you and me.
:)
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Danny D. posted for all of us...

IDK, ask the suspension.
--
Tekkie

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Danny D. posted for all of us...

Good Fast Cheap Pick two You seem to want premium stuff at bankruptcy prices.
--
Tekkie

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Paintedcow wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:13:55 -0600:

It's very easy to mount and unmount "medium" profile (50 series) tires on BBS aluminum rims using the Harbor Freight tool.
I have done SUV tires (70 series) too, which are much harder but still doable.
I wouldn't go any bigger than 17 inch diameter though, nor any taller than 70 series (and I prefer my 50 series as the shorter and thinner the sidewall, the easier it is).
The aluminum rims don't get scratched at all (a bit of red paint, that's it) and the steel rims are actually more of a pain because in my experience, they're harder to balance and the weights go on differently (bang on edge versus stick on the inside).
All you need are three things, none of which are expensive: 1. Compressor (most already have that) 2. Tire Changing Tool (Harbor Freight has them on sale periodically) 3. Static Wheel Balancer (same as above, costs more than the changer)
My first 5 wheel replacement job payed for all the tools as the price for the tools and weights was almost exactly what it would have cost for a shop to mount and balance the five tires I had shipped to my house from Tire Rack.
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Danny D. wrote:

Obviously you only do a static balancing. Is that good enough for your driving?
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Tony Hwang wrote, on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:42:18 -0700:

I have a bimmer. Older E39 model. Rides fine with the five tires I mounted and balanced myself with this.
HF Mounter:
https://i.imgur.com/hGeRFBv.jpg
HF Balancer:
https://i.imgur.com/hEQ3XHS.jpg
I go about 80 or 85 on California highways which are some of the best maintained roads in the country as far as I can tell (having come from the east coast where the roads are lousy as all hell).
No vibration, but, I did a very good job of balancing them. I think maybe the BBS aluminum wheels made it easier?
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 01:33:50 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

The BBS rims are no better balance wise than any quality OEM or aftermarket alloy rim. I have Ford OEM alloys for my snows and Eagle Alloy rims for my summer rims on the Ranger. The rims themselves all balance out perfectly on the dynamic balancer with stems installed..
No measurable radial or side to side runout.
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