need water tank telemetry

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Check out Omron, too. Years ago.... they were less cost than AutomationDirect and simpler to program for something like this.
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On 10/29/2014 10:32 PM, Sasquatch Jones wrote:

Thank you!
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/00813-0100-4738.pdf

el-Measurement/Universal-IV.aspx

I have used all brands of control equip and always steer clear of Emerson because everything is proprietary.
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On 10/29/2014 10:34 PM, Sasquatch Jones wrote:

Thank you!
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program them up for a wide range. Best thing was if you only knew a rough idea of how much pressure it would take, we could empty the tank or set it to the low level limit and press a button, then fill it to where we wanted to call a full level and press another button and it was then calibrated to those limits.
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run a hose into the tank and use an air pressure sensing switch located above the level of the water like in a washing machine.
The hose has air in it, not water.
Mark
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On Thu, 30 Oct 2014 07:13:17 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That works a lot better in a washing machine than it would in a tank of water if the water never drops below the end of the hose (like it does a few times a cycle in a washer) Eventually the trapped air in the hose is absorbed in the water and the water level rises in the hose, giving you a low reading. It would work if the hose was sealed and you had something like an ear syringe for a bladder in the bottom of the tank. It is better just to use a water proof pressure sensor at the bottom,
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On Thursday, October 30, 2014 11:18:49 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Good point. thanks for the polite comment Mark
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On Wed, 29 Oct 2014 18:29:52 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

The local water district uses several methods. All tanks have a float and a rope pully, so that anyone can walk up to the tank and see the water level. They are also part of a SCADA (supervisory control and data aquisition) system that monitors the entire water system and displays operating data on a cool looking flow chart display. For a given tank, it's not just the water level that is monitored. As I vaguely recall from memory, there's the flow rates (both in and out), water acidity (for chlorination), current (for cathodic protection) and pump monitoring. Control signals also go the other direction, for turning things on and off. The data is sent back to the district offices via a mix of packet radio, land lines, and cellular data. I suspect the OP doesn't need or want this level of complexity.
Start with an ultrasonic level meter: <https://www.google.com/#q=ultrasonic+water+tank+level+meter Plenty to choose from and fairly cheap. They usually have an RS-232 or RS-485 output which can be sent to a packet radio transmitter. I can't offer specific radio or data collection system suggestions without knowing something about the location and available resources.
More: <https://www.google.com/search?q=water+tank+level+telemetry+system
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