need traction on a deck ramp

I have a recently constructed deck with a ramp. I used a clear sealer on the entire deck, and the ramp is now very slippery. From the posts I've read, it seems I have two options: (1) broadcast some sand on wet sealer, let it dry, and then put on another coat of sealer, or (2) apply non-slip adhesive strips. With the sand approach, I'm wondering how it will hold up, how will it look, and how well will it work - and when it is time to re-seal, I assume I'll need to put down more sand - will this sand-on-sand accumulation cause problems? With the adhesive strip solution, I'm concerned about them not adhering. I've seen many discussions concerning solutions for painted decks, but none for decks sealed with a clear sealer. Does anyone out there have a solution which worked for them? Thanks.
-DT
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You could put some grooves or flutes across the ramp with a router and re-seal it. They wouldn't need to be that deep to improve traction.
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RayV wrote:

I was going to say that! You beat me to it. It would look nice too. Only problem is it could be a place for water to sit. Maybe drill a 1/4" weep hole every couple of foot in the flute groove to ensure no water accumulates. Really it would depend on where you live and your climate. Many parts of the country that water would be gone in hours. Others it would sit for days.
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. . .

Don't cut horizontal grooves, cut chevrons, or a diamond pattern, like isometric graph paper.
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RayV wrote:

That's an interesting idea. Have you had success with this, or do you know anyone who has? I'm looking for a solution that's been tried and has been successful.
-DT
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It really depends on why you want a ramp, and your latitude. The grooves are an excellent idea, and I've had good results with the 3M adhesive grip strips, but if you intend to push a wheelchair up that ramp, and your climate is as snowy and icy as ours gets (Chicago), you're going to want cleats on that ramp. 1x2's slightly shorter than the wheel width of the chair wouldn't be excessive.
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On a ramp at work, we just put a coat of clean poly and spread some sandbox sand on it. Works, an really not visible.
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http://www.handiramp.com/non-skid_water.htm
http://www.matsetc.com/680safetytrax.html
did a google for "traction strips"
--
Steve Barker


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Here's a link to a boating article that may help: http://www.boatus.com/foundation/findings/nonskid2.htm
I've had good results with the non skid compound on my porch. Supposedly, it outlasts sand, which is usually pretty soft. Years ago they used ground nutshells (walnuts, if I recall correctly), but I doubt you can get that anymore. I don't like the tape or glue-on strips, because I'm not convinced they will last in an exterior application.
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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They sell this stuff at HD or Lowe's that's like paint (in any color) with sand/texture built in. Spread that on. Works great. I used it on a wheelchair ramp I built for my mother-in-law's house. Gives decent traction. Some cleats may be good as well for icy/snowy weather.
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