Need to replace Electric Baseboard Heating Units & Replacement Windows

Page 6 of 7  

On Thu, 01 Feb 2007 22:03:50 -0600, Mark Lloyd

I have one, and have never seen anything but zero.
Joe Fischer
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On Thu, 01 Feb 2007 23:14:07 -0500, Joe Fischer

Mine only reads higher than zero if I force it to by creating CO (run car on driveway and open the door)
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<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message wrote:

Display, not alarm.
I can't "see" the "display" while I sleep. Is that safe?
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Steve Cothran wrote:

1 Million BTU = 293 kWh * $0.15 (NY) = $43.95
Propane wins. Plus, when the power goes out, propane still runs, if I had electric, I freeze to death.
--
Steve Spence
Dir., Green Trust
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What's the cost on a gal of LP up there?
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kjpro @ usenet.com wrote:

Last fill up was $2.20/gallon.
100 gallon minimum.
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Steve Spence
Dir., Green Trust
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Not to bad then, I figured with your electric cost that it would have been higher than that.
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On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 19:39:55 -0500, Steve Spence

Ouch. Our electic rate here is ~0.085/kwh depending on usage. Don't know how long that will last, though.
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With most recent statement in hand....
I pay Superior Propane $1.008 per litre. My bill includes a $6.00 "transportation fee" and an additional $3.95 "hazardous mat handling fee". My consumption during this billing period was 94.5 litres and my total bill, including tax, comes to $119.93.
There are approximately 24,200 BTUs per litre of propane (7.1 kWh). If I multiple 94.5 litres by 24,200 BTUs, the result is 2,286,900 BTUs.
That means one million BTUs cost me $52.44. That's the equivalent of buying electricity at $0.18 per kWh. Assuming an 80 per cent conversion efficiency, my actual cost per kWh(e) is just over $0.22.
The net result is that I pay more than twice as much for propane as I do electricty.
Cheers, Paul
wrote:

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So how do you run the fan in the furnace when the power is out?
Donald
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Donald Kinney wrote:

My furnace doesn't have a fan, plus I'm off grid, so my power is never out. Propane wall heaters are non-electric. My primary heat is wood, but I have propane heat for when I want to go away for a weekend.
--
Steve Spence
Dir., Green Trust
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had
The thing that most everyone is missing is this...
There are many ways to provide heat without electric, but for the most part... they are inefficient and not as comfortable as other heat sources.
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see
What figures would you like me to input for you?
List the fuel types, fuel cost and equipment efficiencies... and I'll get you the end cost per million btu transferred into the space.
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full cord of tamarack wood. $160.00 delivered. Cast iron stove. 82.5%
http://www.blazeking.com/Blazekingwoodproducts/kingclassic.htm
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save
$12.12
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get
Sorry, I missed something here.........
It should be $7.46 per million btu entered into the space.
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wrong. the cord of wood was split inside the heated space.
factor in the btu's generated while splitting the wood.
heat source: calories burned.
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can
I'll
Like I was supposed to know it wasn't split. <rolleyes>
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As you probably know, LP is derived from either oil or natural gas and its price thus closely follows these other two fuels. And since the U.S. is a net importer of oil and gas and since the gap between supply and demand continues to grow wider day by day, its price is likely to become increasingly volatile over time, with the long-term trend pointing upward. Also worth noting you'll be competing (should I say fighting?) with the rest of the world for these resources as they become increasingly more scarce.
Electricity prices are likely to remain more stable over the long term, as a good portion is generated by way of coal and nuclear (both domestic resources) and therefore not subject to the same external market forces. Plus electricity can capitalize on a growing portfolio of renewable resources such as wind, small hydro, geothermal, solar, etc., that generally have very low operating costs and, thankfully, much more modest environmental impact. This will further add to the diversity in supply and perhaps help dampen price pressures on other competing fuels.
I don't want to suggest everyone race out to their local home improvement store and buy armfuls of electric baseboard heaters; that would be insane. However, when it comes time to evaluate your heating options, I hope a geothermal or air source heat pump will be added to the list.
As previously noted, a high efficiency heat pump can produce three times more heat, per kWh, than an electric baseboard heater, even in cold, northern climates. I can buy a ductless heat pump today with a 21 SEER rating and a HSPF of 11.0 -- that's double the efficiency of many heat pumps now in service. And the good news is that the Japanese are working hard to advance that bar even higher, which begs the question: where's America's leadership in this area?
Looking at it another way, if I were to switch from electric baseboard heat to a high efficiency heat pump, electricity prices could double or triple and I would still pay less per month than what I do now. That's precisely the long-term price protection a high efficiency heat pump can offer me today.
As always, do whatever you can to lower your heating and cooling requirements through generous insulation and careful air sealing. Then, and only then, take a look at some of the alternative heating systems that have the potential to dramatically lower your monthly energy costs.
Cheers, Paul

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As an addendum to my previous note, I came across this on the Bloomberg,com website earlier today:
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid 602099&sid=awkcBfv4zsm0&refer=energy
Tony Blair, speaking of the U.K.'s own declining North Sea oil and gas reserves and the subsequent future of nuclear power in that country spelled it out in rather blunt terms.... ``We are going to move from self sufficiency in gas to importing 90 percent of it'.
North Sea production peaked in 1999 and has been steadily falling ever since.
Cheers, Paul
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