Need to replace Baseboard Heaters with ??

So we have a guest house that had 20 year old 220v electric Baseboard heaters. Flip a few on and watch the Meter Fly!
So I'm looking to replace them with either another baseboard unit, or a Wall unit.
We have one of the portable radiator type fin units filled with oil and I like the way it can still heat after the oil's been warmed up.
Do they make a Baseboard heater that I can Mount to the Wall that does something Similar? I do not want a Portable unit, I want something Fixed.
Any Suggestions?
Scott<-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scott Townsend wrote:

The question you want to be asking is how replacing an electric heater with another electric heater (oil-filled or not) is going to alter the spinning of the meter.
<sarcasm off/>
If there is absolutely no other fuel source available, focus on reducing heat loss (windows, wall/ceiling insulation, etc.)
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I expected more grief then that! ;-P
The old units look like this: http://tinyurl.com/ywbnz2
Pretty hideous.
If its all Apples to Apple, So maybe something like this then? http://www.iap-home.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&Product_ID 88
I do like this unit though... Seems like the Hydronic would be more efficient though. http://www.iap-home.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&Product_ID 98 Waste the Energy heating the oil, then the oil still retains the heat. Exhaust heaters once they are off, you are done...
Scott<-

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scott Townsend wrote:

That ceiling heater will blow a blast of very hot air down on you.
The Hydronic baseboard is nicer and air temps will be much more suitable. But.....that one is only 1250 watts. Find out the total wattage of the unit you're ripping out. That's (approx.) how many watts you'll need.
All of these heaters, whether ceiling, plain baseboard or baseboard Hydronic are 100% efficient (round numbers). That means that everything passing thru your meter gets turned into heat. (Of course, this ignores the fact that the generating plant, if fossil-fired, is only 35% efficient.)
So, choose a heater which will be adequate size and that will distribute the heat.
Head to the BigBox store and get draft-stopping supplies. I'm sure the clerk could assist on that. For next season, look into doing insulation in walls/ceilings. Only you can factor in what the budget will support and how big a priority it is.
Jim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Let's start with the basic physics. It takes "x" amount of heat to make the room comfortable. For example, you may need 5000 Btu per hour given the outdoor temperature to maintain 68 degrees. If electric, that will be 1500 Watts per hour. That means the heater will run 100% of the time. Buy a 3000 watt heater and it will run 50% of the time.
Next is efficiency. All electric heaters are 100% efficient. All the heat made by resistance is going into the room the heater is located. Gas or oil heaters need to be ventilated so from a few percent to 30 percent of the heat may be going up the chimney. In most areas, electric is the most expensive form of energy. Here in New England, we pay 17 or so per kWh.
So, why choose one heater over the other? If you need that 1500 watts of heat on the coldest day and the heat is on al the time, it may be nice and comfy and cozy. if, OTOH, it is a 3000 watt heater it will run only half the time so there will be some variations of room temperature as the heater cycles off and on. How often id determined by the range of the thermostat. Good ones will turn the heat on, then off, with a tiny temperature fluctuation. On at 67.5, off at 68.5. Cheap ones may turn on at 66 and off at 70.
The hydronic heaters are filled with a liquid adding thermal mass, just like the radiators of years past. It took a little for them to get hot, but once the boiler stopped, they kept giving off heat for some time keeping the room steady and gently heated. In any case, the heat is not wasted, it is just distributed over a longer time period and you tend to feel more comfy.
If you want to save money, I'd first seal up and insulated as best you can. I'd also look at alternative fuels, such as propane or wood pellets. They may or may not be cheaper or as convenient. There are web pages that allow you to put in the cost of fuels and do comparisons.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah, basic nonsense :-)
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are welcome. Here's more: power is measured in watts, not "Watts per hour."
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

Heat is energy and therefore is to be provided in terms of energy units, which would be power x time.
Banty
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Exactly. "Per" means "divided by" time, which implies an acceleration of power ("Cap'n, we're up to Warp 11! She canna take much morra this!" :-)
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks guys.
Since this is a 'rental' and its only 520 SqFt (the whole unit, not just the one room) I'm thinking the 1500 watt unit should be fine. The Last tenant had a portable 1500 watt radiant oil filled heater and they usually put it on 1500 watt for a bit to take the Chill off, then set it to 700 watt to maintain.
Being that I've just finished building a house I'm not really interested in spending much time and effort on this small rental. So I'm looking for something that I can Fix to the wall/ceiling and hard wire in so I can meter it (along with the Stove and a few other things) so we can charge for it. The other Outlets are not on the Meter. (if you really want to know why, I can explain, but...) Quick and Efficient. (-;
There is no Fireplace or any roof penetrations, so back to the quick and not wanting to spend time, I don't think a fireplace/pellet stove is in my future.
Wait, We'll be putting in an Electric Oven.. What if I get one with Convection? Have her turn on the Oven and the Convection fan... Adjust the baking tem to what she wants the room to be? (-;
Scott<-

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Qmark makes them. Not only will the price of using them, knock your socks off, but the price of buying them will as well. Here's a link: http://www.iap-home.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&Product_ID 99&source=nextag&kw99

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 20:57:58 GMT, Scott Townsend wrote:

My daughter has electric baseboard heat and the cost is not very high. In fact it costs less to heat the 1900sf house than it does to heat their 1100sf trailer. However, the baseboard is only in the house addition. The old part of the house is gas heat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scott Townsend wrote:

The thing is, while its heating the oil its not heating the room. Heating oil to heat a room is going to use more energy than to just heat the room.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eric wrote:

. Nope. As several people have said electric heat is 100% efficient.
As Edwin said the oil just maintains heat output over a longer time.
--
bud--

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bud-- wrote:

So, is it a good idea to replace my standard base board heaters with this Hydronic type?
--
Message posted via http://www.homekb.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It will give a more even heat in a drafty room. Certainly not a bad idea, but it may be a bit more costly to buy. Over a number of years, it is cheap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.