Need to connect 1/4" copper tubing to garden hose.

I am trying to connect the water supply to my evaporative cooler via a garden hose, then a 1/4" copper line to the cooler. If I run copper all the way it plugs up in my hard water after a year or so. But connection between the hose and copper has me stumped.
I wrapped the copper line with duct tape until it would just fit inside the garden hose. Then I used two hose clamps to hold it. A few hours later evidently the water pressure in the hose, though only on slightly, had pushed out the tape-wrapped tubing. I next tried winding some wire around the tubing and hose and wrapping it with waterproof tape. I don't expect it to work.
I need a way to go from 1/4" copper tubing to male garden hose. I asked about it in Lowes this mrning when I bought the hose. They didn't know of anything.
So this seems like this project will be a failure unless I can come up with something. That water pressure is relentless. I will either need to use waterproof cement or come up with a series of connectors. I thought about silicon caulk squeezed in at the hose end around the copper (retaining the wrapped duct tape and hose clamps) but I don't think it will work either.
Any suggestions please?
TIA
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I've seen all the parts you need at Lowe's. Look in the brass fittings area in plumbing. You will want a compression fitting to attach to the copper and whatever they stock to adapt to the hose.
Bob
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to 1/4" compression. Your best is go to ma plumbing supply They can set you up. There are other configurations you can do
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That's pretty much what I did. But I tried a hardware store first and had some good help.

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Ken Knecht wrote:

First: you should not be using copper pipe. Use the 1/4" plastic, it will use the same fitting and you won't have any hard water build up.
Second: The simplest solution is to buy a faucet with a 1/4" compression connector on the side between the inlet and the valve. You can get these faucets with a pipe thread or a hose thread. The hose thread allows you to screw the faucet on the end of a hose, then you connect your 1/4" line to 1/4" compression fitting.
Most people would put this type of faucet on your existing faucet and then connect 1/4" polypropylene between the faucet and the cooler. Besides, the polypropylene tubing is cheap compared to copper.
Apparently, whoever you talked to knew nothing about how evaporative coolers are connected to the water supply and knew nothing about plumping. Lowes does have all the parts you need.
Good Luck, maybe you should look in the department that sells evaporative coolers, since they have all the parts need to hook them up in that department.
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Or buy a hose to 1/4" adapter for plastic drip irrigation pipe.
Al
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Big Al wrote:

be suitable for the application. If the tubing splits in a garden, there would be no problem but if it splits near a window, or whatever, it could result in a flood. Would you use plastic drip pipe for indoor plumbing?
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On Thu, 24 Aug 2006 06:38:55 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

It sounds like he only said to use the adapter, not the drip pipe itself.
CWM
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Charlie Morgan wrote:

Ahh, you may be right. Don't think a drip pipe adapter (not sure how those work) would allow properly connecting 1/4" copper or polypropylene tubing that use compression and ferrules for connections.
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On Thu, 24 Aug 2006 20:28:31 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

I think it's somewhat similar, but might not be an exact match without some creativity. It could probably be made to work though. The exact right adapters exist if they can be sourced.
CWM
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If you are still looking Home Depot has one part that goes from a female hose connection to a 1/4" compression. If this isn't the right gender you will have make something up from 2 or 3 different fittings.

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First off -- DO NOT USE DRIP IRRIGATION TUBING!!!! It is not designed to hold the pressure! When it gets warm in the sun it will burst! I have had customers tell me it has happened to them.
In the cooler parts department of Lowes, Home Depot, Ace, and True Value all sell a "hose bibb adapter valve" that screws onto your existing hose bibb valve as you would a hose. This adapter valve looks and works just like another hose bibb valve so you can still connect a hose. It also has a threaded hole in the side for a 1/4 inch connector for the tubing to go to your cooler. This adaptor valve is made specificly for this purpose.
As far as copper vs poly tubing... poly is cheaper but usually doesn't last as long as copper. Just make sure that you get the correct connectors to the adaptor for the tube material that you choose. Mineral build-up is usually not a problem with the copper line that feeds to the cooler.
To learn more service and repair information on evaporative coolers, visit: www.easycoolercare.com
Larry Galpin The Cooler Doctor
Service, Repair & Enhance the Performance of Your Cooler Yourself and Save $100s Every Year!
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