Need temporary fix for ceiling rain leak

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I live in an apartment, and the living room ceiling near the deck has a rain leak: During the biggest rainstorms, some water drips down onto my carpet from one particular spot on the ceiling. There's a stain on the ceiling there too.
I've had the maintenance people in my apartment twice, but so far they have failed to fix the problem. They'll have to try again next week.
While they're still trying to figure it out, is there some *temporary* fix I can use to stop the water from dripping from the ceiling every time there's a big storm?
Silicone caulk? Rope caulk? Anything else?
--
Steven L.

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From what I've learned of roof leaks, you ought not try to patch it from indoors. Then, the water will collect in the ceiling and create worse problems.
I'd patch it the roof. Or clear indoor floor, and put down buckets. Put a towel in the bucket, so the water doesn't bounce, splash up and out.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I live in an apartment, and the living room ceiling near the deck has a rain leak: During the biggest rainstorms, some water drips down onto my carpet from one particular spot on the ceiling. There's a stain on the ceiling there too.
I've had the maintenance people in my apartment twice, but so far they have failed to fix the problem. They'll have to try again next week.
While they're still trying to figure it out, is there some *temporary* fix I can use to stop the water from dripping from the ceiling every time there's a big storm?
Silicone caulk? Rope caulk? Anything else?
--
Steven L.



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On Feb 6, 9:55 am, "Stormin Mormon"

+1
It's getting into the ceiling from outside. How on earth could you stop it at the ceiling? Regardless of what you tried to do, the water would still be coming in. If anything you could make the problem worse, because the water will just pool up until it finds another place to go. That could be 5 ft away and then you have a new leak and a screwed ceiling in between. Just put a bucket under it until they fix it.
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Nope, must be fixed on the roof.
Use a bucket.
--
Dan Espen

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Others have given you good advice (bucket). Move any possessions out of the way of the water, and out of the way of the eventual collapse of the ceiling's sheetrock. Quite a bit can come down at once, so clear a large area.
About the only temporary fudge-fix I can think of is to try and re-direct the water so it runs off to the side. You may be able to affix a sheet of heavy plastic (e.g.: vapor barrier) to the ceiling inboard of the leak, and slope it down, off to the side, and into a bucket. But that may be more trouble than it's worth.
--
Tegger

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On 2/6/2013 11:09 AM, Tegger wrote:

Well, there goes my home entertainment center. :-(
I had better move my TV, DVR, etc., completely out of that corner of the room.
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Absolutely! Move it far away and cover it with plastic. Depending on how the ceiling is built and how much rain falls, water can actually puddle up there. And when the drywall finally falls down, that puddle can splash/soak a large area.
Better read up on your home-contents insurance as well. Your landlord's insurance almost certainly /won't/ cover your possessions.
--
Tegger

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Steven L. wrote:

You could also try putting a small hole in the ceiling right where the water is now dripping from. That may help let the water out from the ceiling so it doesn't build up and get heavy and cause the sheetrock to collapse as others mentioned. And, hopefully with the hole you can direct the water to drop directly into the bucket below.
But, still move you belongings from the area below if possible.
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On 2/6/2013 1:17 PM, TomR wrote:

Yes, the water tends to drip from a spot on the ceiling that's right near the wall. I might be able to catch it with a funnel that I'll tape to the wall.
It sounds like it's actually better to let the water drip out, rather than try to seal it up in the ceiling!
--
Steven L.

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Yes, that's for sure.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
It sounds like it's actually better to let the water drip out, rather than try to seal it up in the ceiling!
--
Steven L.



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Yes, it is better to let it drip. But don't go making any holes in the ceiling! This is your landlord's problem, not yours. If he sees that you've poked a hole in the ceiling and the ceiling later falls in, he may accuse you of having precipitated the collapse through your action. The accusation may be groundless, but it may lead to hard feelings, or worse. The last thing you want in a rental relationship.
Move your stuff, then leave the situation alone and let it do what it wants to do. If the leak never gets fixed, consult a paralegal as to your legal options.
--
Tegger

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Tegger wrote:

I guess that's possible, but if all you do is make a small hole -- maybe 1/4 inch or less -- I don't see you having any problem. If you have a digital camera, take a few pictures now, and again after you put the small hole in.
Or, you could wait until it rains again and starts dripping and call them again. If you can get them to come out then, ask them to put a small hole there so the water will drip out into a bucket rather than building up in the ceiling and/or wall. And, of course, keep notes or records of any contacts you made with the landlord and/or maintenance company and when they came out etc.
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On 2/6/2013 4:19 PM, TomR wrote:

The maintenance guy promised me he'll try once again to fix it tomorrow. That's the third try.
We're about to get a big Nor'easter storm on Friday.
If my ceiling collapses--after *three* attempts by the maintenance people to fix this--do I have any legal recourse?
I mean it's not just the physical damage that a collapsed ceiling will do. It's also that there's probably a ton of mold/mildew already up there from the moisture, and with the ceiling gone, now I'm going to be breathing in all that crap as well. I have sinus and bronchitis problems already, and I don't need to be breathing in what is likely to be found up there!
--
Steven L.

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On Wed, 06 Feb 2013 19:44:29 -0500, "Steven L."

It's an apartment, right? Move! They certainly can't hold you to a lease if they can't fix a leak.
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On Wed, 06 Feb 2013 19:49:46 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Likely WRONG advice at this point but if the ceiling collapses or floor becomes unsafe to walk upon, etc... then the OP may have a case to break the lease. Hopefully this is covered in his lease. It is in Texas std. apt or residential leases.
Another option if the OP wants, is to ask the manager if he can relocate into another unit either permanently or until the leak is fixed. Some managers will accomodate the tenant if a unit is available.
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clipped

There might also be local code re repairs to rental homes and when the renter is excused from breaking the lease....damned if I'd stay in a rental with leaky ceiling without raising heck :o)
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wrote:

The landlord is sending the repairman multiple times so it sounds like the landlord is trying. I don't think getting mad at the landlord is going to help but asking to relocate might be an option.
As to the cost to relocate, I suppose you can ask but not sure if the landlord is legally responsible for this. In Texas, the property code spells out when you can break a lease without legal consequences.
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On 2/7/2013 7:42 AM, Doug wrote:

OP didn't say who sent the maintenance people (or I didn't read the post that indicated that)....I didn't suggest beating up the landlord, but if one understands the possible consequences of the leak continuing, then I'd be on his case and persist :o) I've encountered some really lousy landlords, so there are lots of possibilities...sounds like an older building....an old retiree owner with a crank "handyman", or realestate holding co. with another co. managing? Highly unwise for an owner to hire hacks who don't properly handle water leaks.

well :o)
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wrote:

I agree.
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Who in their right mind is going to move all there stuff from one apartment to another because of one small leak in the ceiling that can be contained with a bucket? That to me is far more disruptivde than having a bucket around until the leak can be located and fixed. And it doesn't make any sense from the landlord perspective either. The leak has to be fixed or they can't rent it to someone else.
Locating it is the problem. It sounds like it's a leak from some point on an exterior wall, not a roof leak. Those can be hard to find and it's not unusual for it to take several attempts to solve it, even when the landlord is doing all the right things.

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