Need info on Honeywell L7224U boiler control

I am thinking of installing a Honeywell L7224U electronic boiler control on my Weil McLain gold series boiler. I do not make hot water with my boiler, and as so, it does not run when the house is not calling for heat. It has a single aquastat L8148A on it now that does not have a low limit control to keep the boiler warm. According to my oil service company tech, this cooling off causes moisture buildup, and because of the moisture, causes any fluffy carbon build up in the boiler to solidify, and clog up the unit, which has happened a few times already. The L7224U control box has a programmable low limit that you can set as low as 110 degrees, just to keep the boiler warm when the house is not calling for heat in the summer. My service guy says that this should keep the carbon from solidifying and plugging up the boiler. I have read thru the instructions, and there is only 1 thing that I question. If the power goes out, does the unit lose all of its programming, or does it retain it all during a power outage ??? I can't find anyone who has installed one of these yet and has any experience with them.
                    RON =======================================================Remove the ZZZ from my E-mail address to send me E-mail.
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It has to have something to retain its settings, but why get such a fancy, expensive control. Just wire an aquastat into the water jacket that closes at 110 degrees or whatever you like and be sure to wire it into the burner circuit only, so it doesn't start any circulators

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Or, you could just replace the current aquastat relay on the unit with a triple aquastat relay like Honeywell L8124A1007 which will do the same thing as the current one, with the addition of the low temp cut in, which you can set as low as 110

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Aside from what your tech has indicated, I've found that boilers that were allowed to go cold during summer months, tended to develop premature leaks between the sections from the expansion and contraction

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This is simply not true. And his "tech" is no tech.
-zero
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were
leaks
Finally a reply that's accurate!
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Wow! I guess Ive been doing it all wrong all these years. I better go back and turn all those boilers on this summer............hehehehe. RBM is a morooooon! Learn dude, Learn. "leaks from expansion and contraction"??? You're making my mind wobble. Bubba
On Sun, 13 May 2007 15:56:39 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

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