need hot water FAST

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unit

for
the
water
or
BTW, do you know what a branched system is?
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I downloaded a .pdf from the Grundfos comfort site. The one I opened had nothing to say about cleaning and was an exact copy of the I & O manual.
If you are so very certain you are correct, why not post the link to the .pdf you're talking about. Most people obscure the facts simply by not giving all the info available. BTW, I'm emailing all this info to my contact with Grundfos.

reason
You
if
3
electric
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Hello McFly...anybody in there "knock on head"... see the picture with a brush scrubb scrub scrub... that depicts cleaning... calcium from the pump... Those that have used non-RedyTemp recirc's know the deal... I'm not concerned with your dust mite opinions. As Walter Chronkite would put it........GOOD DAY!!!
wrote:

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Oh no, the Ready Temp Ass is back, Well I never cleaned my B&G and dont know anyoune who has. If you had water that hard the usual pocedure is to add a sotener. Or if you are Ready Temp ,,,just Lie and Scare everyone,
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On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 11:00:07 -0600 (CST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

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Gee i thought it was 3000, im getting slow in my old age, But Ready Temp only needs one to show he is full of it,, Just like his Co disclaimer on their published " facts"
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You just don't have a clue, do you?
You emailed me an attachment. I don't open attachments, but I did notice it had 'eur' in the line. Smart guy. That means it was for Europe, not North America.
If I gave you a quarter, would you buy a clue?
The

less
THAN
frozen,
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it
North
A full DNS scan of his sites posted elsewhere...you can actually tell him yourself how you feel....
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Insulate all of the hot water pipes that you can get to. Homedepot sells a hot water pump that mounts under the sink that pulls hot water and pushes the cold back into the cold water pipe, ~$150.00. I think. I have one. Place the pump at the farthest away from the water heater. All of my lines are underground and the water takes a while to get warm. With the pump I hit the switch brush my teeth and hot water is waiting for me. I even have it on a timer that is ready for me in the mornings before I go to work.
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Let me add one more to the list. With an electric heater, one dead element can cause some strange results. With either electric or gas a bad dip tube or mis plumbed (incoming water connected to the hot (outlet) and outgoing water connected to the cold water supply can cause such problems.
Five minutes, if it is really that long, would indicate a long string of odd situations, like extra large supply lines, cold area, heavy heat sink pipe material and very long runs from the heater to the outlet.
Do all the sinks tubs etc in you home have the same problem?
What kind of hot water heater do you have? Integrated with you home heat, electric, gas, oil, no-tank?
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I've timed it. For each faucet, it takes 3-4 minutes before the water that comes out is warm. It is an excruciating long time to wait for warm water, especially now that it is winter. In the summer, I didn't mind washing my hands in cold water.
I'm in NC, my hot water heater uses gas and is located in the attic of my 2-story house, not integrated. The pipes for the first floor bathroom and kitchen run along the top of the cold crawl space under the house. It has been a while since I was in the crawl space but I think the piping I saw was clear plastic, not copper. But still, even the 2nd floor bathroom faucets take the same amount of time before warm water comes out.
I just want to know what I can do differently the next time I have a builder build me a house. I am satisfied with everything the builder did when building my home except for this one nagging problem.

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In alt.home.repair snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (PV) wrote:

Imagine that. The expert said only Texas does that.
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Last house I plumbed for myself, I used 1/4" copper lines from the water heater to the individual fixtures. It was no big deal, since there were only three, but the kitchen was far enough away that it would have taken a LONG time to get hot water. Sounds like you're encountering that sort of thing. The lines ran in the basement, and obviously had plenty of opportunity to cool down.
Later, when I had to rerun that kitchen line for a remodeling project, I was very careful to put a gentle but steady upward slope to it as it went towards the kitchen. that way, the warm water was presented to the fixture.
We never had to wait for hot water at the fixture, and I don't know which path made the difference, but I certainly remind you that the bigger the delivery line, the longer it takes to empty its contents.

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I think your problem is with the heater, not the distribution system.
"It has been a while since I was in the crawl space but I > think the piping I saw was clear plastic, not copper."
I have never heard of clear plastic being approved for domestic hot water, but I guess it is possible. It is used for hot water heat supply (well sort of clear). Maybe your memory is not too clear from when you saw it.
I suggest getting a plumber out to check it. It should be correctable, and I am going to guess it is not going to cost all that much.
Frankly in your area, I don't think I would want any plumbing going through a non-heated part of my home, nor would I want my hot water heater in an area not easily assessable.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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The other builder in the subdivision (DR Horton) placed their hot water heaters in the garage. When I asked to have mine put in the garage, my builder scoffed at the idea and said the raising and lowering of the garage doors would frequently blow the pilot light out.
The attic where the heater sits is pretty cold and the crawl space under the house is pretty cold. I can see why it takes a while to get hot water.
Thanks for all the comments. Something to keep in mind for the next house.

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I would not want a gas water heater in the garage. Open flames and gasoline don't mix.
Around her, they are put in utility rooms in homes without basements.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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PV wrote:

<snipped>
How about trying this check and telling us the results:
Tomorrow morning, before anyone opens a hot water faucet in the house, clamber up to where the hot water heater is and grab the outlet pipe a couple of feet from the heater.
Then yell down to SWMBO to open a hot water tap somewhere and then see how the pipe feels.
If it was warm and cools down, then there's a problem with the heater.
Might be that the installer screwed up and plumbed the inlet and outlet reversed so it's feeding the water out through the dip tube from the bottom of the tank where the cooler water sits, instead of from the top, where the heated water rises to. That's not hard to do if you don't pay attention to the "Hot and Cold" markings on the tank.
If the pipe gets hot right away and stays hot for the several minutes it takes for the water at the tap to get hot, then as most of the others have said, it's a piping length/volume problem, best solved by using one of those motorized recirculating pmp thingies and some additional piping, or selling the house. (Ducking...)
Happy New Year,
-- Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
http://home.comcast.net/~jwisnia18/jeff /
"If you can keep smiling when things go wrong, you've thought of someone to place the blame on."
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You can add a recirculating pump that constantly moves hot water through the hto water lines. I beleive though that this is a job for a plumber.

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