Need help figuring out how to fix rot damage


I have some serious rot damage on a 4x6 beam holding up my front porch. I'm wondering how you guys would approach repairing it. It's easier to see photos than describe so I've uploaded some photos here:
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(I thought I'd be able to edit my post after sending.) Anyway here are more photos. Any help appreciated!
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On Oct 31, 7:05 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cheerful.com wrote:

Part of the problem is the way the beem protrudes beyound the facia. This allows water to collect there on top of it. It looks like temporary supports could be put in place while the damaged parts is removed and replaced. After replacement I would apply flashing and caulk to protect the facia and provide water drainage. Also consider redesigning the way the beam extends beyound the facia. Cutting it at a slope to help it shed water would help. Jimmie
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Yes but would you replace the whole beam? All 20' of it? Or can I just tack on a stub to replace the damaged bit, which doesn't quite reach the vertical support?
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snipped-for-privacy@cheerful.com wrote: ...

The pictures I saw show the damage but not the structure. What's the load? Whatever is left w/ the repair has to have the same structural integrity as the original (unless the beam is simply decorative, not structural). Not enough info to tell.
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The first thing to do is put up a gutter so that water does not come directly off the rooof and collect at the joint that has now rotted out.
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On Oct 31, 8:06 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cheerful.com wrote:

Really cant tell from the photo.You got to expect the OP to have some common sense about this sort of thing otherwise he shouldnt be messing about with it anyways.
Jimmie
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Common sense yes, which is why I'm not just going to Bondo it and walk away :). I might even hire (choke) a professional (cough) to do it, as I'm just a handy homeowner type. But quite handy, with a lot of experience. The beam is definitely structural - it supports the whole porch roof. The part where the fascia crosses the beam is completely gone, but even though the fascia is a 2x6, I'm assuming (and that's why I'm asking you guys) that it's decorative, and the true support for the roof is inside where I can't see it. (A theory supported by the fact that the fascia is in 2 joined pieces.) If that is the case, might I be able to pop off the fascia (easier said than done I'm sure, as the flashing from the roof is nailed to it, but anyway), open up a bit of the stucco soffit so I can see what's going on, and saw the beam off at the vertical support. Then somehow fasten another foot- long piece to the end of the beam, make a new piece of fascia, and button it all back up again?
I know, if you can't see it you probably won't be able to tell me. If there's an angle in a photo you need to see, I'll take it and upload it. I'll probably go to a contractor to fix it, but if I can do it myself then I can pay for another semester of my son's college ...
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On Oct 31, 7:51 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cheerful.com wrote:

From the photos, it looks like the various pieces are staying in place even though there is daylight between the two main pieces. My comments on the need for a gutter still stand. I would replace with pressure treated wood for all involved replacements. Can you get pressure treated 2x 6, 2x8, 2x10's etc? If you could do a lap joint when you replace the bad wood, it would be a lot stronger than just replacing the entire rotted out section with a butt joint onto the old/ new wood. I would have lots of support posts ready to hold everything up before starting to do anything.
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On Oct 31, 5:51 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cheerful.com wrote:

The detail (close up) photos are fine...what we need is global shot to establish context.
Like the third photo but from further away. And some white space in your post to make it easier to read.
Guessing from the existing data, I think what I'm seeing as the 2x6 member is not a fascia but an edge rafter? You mention it being in two pieces...is that the "joint" above the beam? It appears to have been notched at the time of construction. The notch provided a water entrapment feature and thus a perfect place for rot to grow.
Dont saw off the beam! I would consider busting open the stucco soffit and tapering the top surface of the beam to remove the rot......maybe enough material can be removed to get down to sound material within the limit of the 2x6. Then consider sistering in piece to reinforce the 2x6 and bear on the sound beam material.
Whether this apporach will work depends on the geometry of the rafter / beam interface and the extent of the rot. The bending load in the beam at the rotted section is probably low and the beam behavior is most likely shear dominated that the point so you might be able to get away with a reduced beam depth at the rafter bearing point.
Remove are much rot as possible and treat with a anti-fungal when the ant-fungal solvent carrier evaporates do an epoxy (not bondo) repair
www.abatron.com sells structure wood repair epoxy
cheers Bob
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I'll have to re-read this a couple of times to understand it, but thanks for the input! I'll upload a longer view in the morning - I should have thought of that.
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Don't know about anyone else, but pressure treated two bys, and sistering comes to mind.
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Christopher A. Young
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YougottoseparateoutsomeoftheothertextinordertomakethelinksclickableChristopherA.YoungLearnmoreaboutJesuswww.lds.org .
I have some serious rot damage on a 4x6 beam holding up my front porch. I'm wondering how you guys would approach repairing it. It's easier to see photos than describe so I've uploaded some photos here:
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snipped-for-privacy@cheerful.com wrote:

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On Oct 31, 6:01 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cheerful.com wrote:

Hello,
I think you're quite capable of doing the repair. All of the load is being supported by the beam, the only part that is not supported is the fascia and *maybe* one joist (the outer most). Just cut off the bad section back to good wood, attach anything to the end as it will only be decorative after this, flash and you're done. Of course, finish it out as you prefer, gutters, flashing, eopxy, whatever. Good luck,
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More photos below including a longer view so you know where the damage . Sorry it's a little hard to see, but the red 2x6 is a fascia, nailed to a rafter. The rafter sits on a partially rotted part of the beam.I'm considering opening up the soffit enough to bolt or nail a 3- or 4-foot sister rafter to the existing one, which would sit on good wood. Then I can cut off the rot, replace the end of the beam with a chunk of 4x6, probably just fix up the fascia with bondo, paint, re- stucco, and flash. Anyone have a better idea? Is 3' long enough for a sister or should I go 5'? 6'?
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only be decorative after this, flash and you're done. <<<<<
& when he does this....what will support the outer most rafter that abuts the back side of the fascia?
Removing load carry structure without replacing it or providing a suitable alternative load path is never a good idea. Leaving the edge rafter unsupported or supported by a scabbed on beam extension will put the roof sheathing system in bending at the edge of the roof, potentially creating a sagging roof edge in the future. cheers Bob
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