Need advise on buying a drill press.

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But that would require effort and intelligence, something he lacks.
Steve
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Very little engineering "adds anything to the base". That's why it's called "engineering", instead of "science".
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Depends on the base. Science is useless if you can't figure out how to utilize it.
nb
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wrote:

I think of engineers as the folk who APPLY science.
Nonny
By the way, there's a place in the world for both engineers and research scientists, and they work together pretty darn well.
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Yes.
Certainly there is room for both in "science". The disciplines are fairly well delineated, however. That is not to say that one person can't do both.
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Utilizing something is about making it affordable. That's not science.
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On 08/17/2010 04:18 PM, Niner wrote:

yes, and use a 1/8" pilot hole for larger holes. For really big holes, use 1/8" and then a larger, intermediate size.
nate
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On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 13:18:44 -0700, Niner wrote:

Yes, I think that's the key there (that and adjusting the speed for the job) - the drill bits make the most difference, and having a good drill with crappy bits is far worse than having a crappy drill with good bits.

Yes, good advice. I'm bad about not doing it either ;-) (for small diameter holes, inserting the drill bit as far as you can is good too, so it's less likely to bend and go off-center)
cheers
Jules
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Bought my Harbor Freight drill press 4 or 5 years ago, on sale for $39.95.
They're $89.95 now, and go on sale periodically for $69.95.
Not a 'precision' machine by any means - spindle bearings allow some play in the chuck, but it's well suited for the home craftsman's needs.
I'd buy it again, even at the now increased price.
Joe
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On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 08:00:45 -0400, J O E wrote:

Yeah, that's what I've found with the cheap ones - there's a bit of slop in the system which isn't there on the better stuff. I've not found it really matters for wood, but on harder materials it can sometimes be an issue.
I wish I'd got a bigger drill, too - not necessarily a floor-standing[1] one, but at least with a bit more depth than what I have (I don't remember the numbers - only that sometimes it's not really quite enough :-)
[1] the temptation's always there to modify the bench-mounted one that I have... either extend the pillar, or somehow rig it so I can swing it out over the edge of the bench.
cheers
Jules
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I bought a floor standing honking 5 foot plus tall 1/2" chuck with moveable table and something like 128 speeds. I use it on most of my stuff except for small things, where I use the small one. I like being able to stand up there, and have the work at a comfortable height, and also that the bed moves up and down and tilts. The light is nice, too. It's a Chinese one, but I paid $100 for it. I didn't use it for years, now, use it mostly. It's overkill most of the time, but with the Drill Doctor 750, it sure makes drilling those jobs with lots of holes a lot easier.
Steve
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Assuming you find the right drill press/whatever, don't even think about starting the drill and tap job without a T-type tap wrench. Go to www.use-enco and look at the 325-49280 and similar tap wrenches on page 110. The $66 may give you sticker shock, but it will perform the job faster than a Bridgeport J2, even with a Harbor Freight drill press. If you factor in all the time, wasted work pieces, broken taps and other problems it is a real bargain. Virtually every journeyman machinist, tool and die maker will have a set of these in his tool box. In combination with solid fixturing and clamping, the job will go very well. And by the way, any 1/3 to 1/2 HP drill press will do just fine. A floor model with a hefty column would be better, and higher priced models usually give you less spindle run out.
Joe
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On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 21:28:46 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

Drilling stainless you want more than enough, ather than almost enough - because you need to keep the bit cutting. Don't consider easing the bit through - you'll just end up burning the tip off. If you are using the aircraft type bits just about any half-inch capacity press will do the job.
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