Need advice on "professional" rug cleaning

When we bought our house a few months ago, my wife went through and cleaned it thoroughly. But she felt it wasn't complete until the rugs were cleaned. So we called a rug cleaning company we found in the yellow pages and got a price quote. When they came, they advised that we get several other features with their service - a deodorizer, a sanitizer and a soil resistance coating. It ended up costing us twice what we thought it would.
We are now selling our previous home and we want to get the rugs there cleaned "professionally" to make the home more presentable.
Two questions: Are all these other "features" really necessary? Did we get ripped off?
Is there a difference between the companies that use a vacuum hose attached to their truck and one that just uses the "rug doctor" type of machine?
I ask this last question because some years ago we called in a cleaner and they had this huge (and loud) vacuum in their truck with hoses going into the truck and water input hooked into our spigot. But this last time around, the guys just came in with one machine that looked like a big floor vacuum. They sprayed stuff on the rugs and then went over it with the machine.
What's the best route to go for this next cleaning? Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Didn't Consumer Reports magazine have an article on rug cleaning, some years back?
I seem to recall, they recommended buying your own machine, compared to Professional Cleaners. You might start your research there.
waterboy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
46erjoe wrote:

Actually if they are really rugs and not carpet, I prefer the in plant cleaning. Far better than what they can do in your home.
Chances are you did not need any of that extra stuff. As for the different equipment; It is not the size of the equipment or the noise (Somehow I suspect a selling point of the truck mounted loud equipment is to advertise the service to your neighbors). The only real thing I would worry about is the professionalism of the outfit doing the work.
I was a tax auditor and I recall one time in the office of a local outfit. Listening to the in office talk convinced me that they were the ones I would use. Clearly the boss insisted that the customer get a good job with no chance of damage to their property and if there was any kind of complaint, it was addressed even if it had nothing to do with the cleaning. More than once I hear "I don't care, if John (the owner) finds out, you know you will be doing it so go ahead and do it, no charge."
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As someone who used to have a terrible wanderlust (well, still does but is trying to learn not to yield to it every time), I've cleaned carpet and had carpet cleaned in more rental houses more times than I can count. In my experience, the person wielding the equipment has been the biggest variable. I have had both dismal and outstanding results with people using both truck-mounted and "Rug Doctor" type of equipment. I've seen my son and his wife make their off-white carpet look better than any service I've ever hired, with the cheapest rental unit they could find.
If you were happy with the job you got before, that company is a good place to start (I probably wouldn't go for the extras -- I have never thought any of them made a difference). Otherwise, I'd ask around and see who's happy with their carpet cleaning pros, or decide to put in the sweat equity and rent/buy a machine.
Incidentally, I've also bought and worn out a couple different carpet cleaning machines, and I think renting something like a Rug Doctor does a better job, although the machines are nice to have around for in-between touch-ups. My best tip for cleaning it yourself is a final once-over with a bit of vinegar in plain water, to make sure you've gotten out all the soap.
Jo Ann
Joseph Meehan wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joseph Meehan wrote:
Let me add, that the magic material used by the professional outfit I referred to was Ivory snow. Nothing stronger is on the trucks.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The house being sold is empty I right? No furniure in it? Nothing you have to lift and move?
Buy a good bissell rug shampoer (sp?) cost you maybe 240 bucks tops. Use it to do all the rugs in the old place two or three times.
Keep it to do your new place and avoid the rip off artists in the "professional rug cleaning" services.
Do the rugs in your new place yourself maybe 3 - 4 (if you are ambitious, but at least twice a year) times a year and the'll look great fr years and years, and the machine will pay for itself in saved fees to the "professional rug cleanrs".
--
Jim McLaughlin

Reply address is deliberately munged.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The experience that I can offer is hear-say only.
A colleague of mine also does carpet cleaning on the side. He cleans several hotel rugs. His largest suggestion is warm water, hands and knees, and a little scrubbing to lift out any soiled areas/patches. Then follow up with a vacuum. He seems to be making decent money with just this as a solution.
Added to this, is a television programming (the name of which eludes me at this time). It was one which these 2 girls evaluate some products, and finally had a "expert" guest on to give his opinion.
His suggestion was warm water, hands and knees, scrub and vacuum. He also suggested using a rug shampoo as the chemicals sometimes do help to break down the soiled areas and make the dirt easier to remove.
So, from what I can gather: 1 set of good hands and knees, 1 bucket with luke warm water, 1 scrub brush, 1 vacuum.
If your like me, you'll still opt to pay someone else to do it for you. :P
Justin 46erjoe wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.